I Just Finished Reading... Top Picks for July

July 13, 2016 | Diane

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Each month I share my favourite new books for 6 – 12 year-olds that have both kid AND parent appeal. I hope you enjoy them, too!


Save Me A SeatSave Me a Seat
By Sarah Weeks and Gita Varadarajan
Ages 8 – 10

Framed around the school cafeteria menu (Monday: Chicken Fingers), this story reflects on a week’s worth of events from the point of view of two fifth grade boys, Joe and Ravi. Ravi has just moved with his family to the United States from India, where he was a popular boy with good grades. Joe has auditory processing disorder, so his sensitivity to sound along with his height cause him to be an outsider. While the two seem to have few similarities, a common enemy in the form of a class bully eventually proves that they are more alike than different.

SlackerSlacker
By Gordon Korman
Ages 9 – 12

Thirteen-year-old Cameron Boxer and his friends take video gaming very seriously. Cam is proud of his slacker “lifestyle”, which revolves around sitting on the couch in his basement with his thumbs frantically operating his gaming console. But after he nearly burns down his house, he’s forced to show his parents that he has other interests, so he starts a fake school club to get them off his back. Little does he realize that the club is going to take off, and despite every effort to get out of it, he’s stuck being the president and his whole life is about to change.

OCDanielOCDaniel
By Wesley King
Ages 10 - 12

Daniel is a reluctant football player -- he’s the back-up punter and not very good at it, so he prefers being the water boy. Living in the shadow of his popular friend Max, Daniel struggles to hide his strange behaviour, like spending hours turning lights on and off, from family and friends. But his crush on classmate Raya forces him out of his comfort zone, resulting in a new friendship with Sara, an outcast with issues of her own. Readers will identify with Daniel’s growing pains, learn more about living with a mental illness and appreciate the themes of acceptance and hope.

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