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Snapshots in History: May 22: Remembering Louis de Buade, Comte de Frontenac

May 23, 2013 | John P. | Comments (0)

Frontenac_receiving_the_envoy_of_Sir_William_Phipps_demanding_the_surrender_of_Quebec,_1690

Frontenac receiving the envoy of Sir William Phipps demanding the surrender of Quebec, 1690.

 

(Digitized image of: Watercolour over pencil on commercial board (circa 1925); Artist: Charles William Jefferys, 1869-1951.)

 

(Source Credit: Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. 1972-26-780 - Copyright: Expired / Expiré )

(Source Credit: http://collectionscanada.gc.ca/pam_archives/index.php?fuseaction=genitem.displayEcopies&lang=eng&rec_nbr=2835229&title=Frontenac+receiving+the+envoy+of+Sir+William+Phipps+demanding+the+surrender+of+Quebec%2C+1690.+&ecopy=c073710k&back_url=() )


On May 22 and beyond, take a moment to reflect on the historical role of Louis de Buade, Comte de Frontenac and de Palluau (Born: May 22, 1622, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France; Died: November 28, 1698, Québec City). “Count Frontenac” served as Governor-General of New France twice (1672-1682, 1689-1698) with a mixed record of government mismanagement and the encouragement of westward expansion. Perhaps he was best known for repulsing British and Iroquois attacks on New France, especially on October 16, 1690 when a British fleet under the command of Sir William Phips sent an emissary ashore seeking the surrender of Québec City when Count Frontenac purportedly and defiantly said: “I have no reply to make to your general other than from the mouths of my cannon and muskets”. Although the British landed a thousand men on the Beauport flats, they did not attack but had to ward off attacks from French-Canadian militia and deal with the cold weather while marching. Consequently, after three days, the British force sailed away. The Historica-Dominion Institute produced a heritage minute video re-enactment to capture Count Frontenac’s defiance in 1690.

Want to learn more about Count Frontenac? Consult these historical adult non-fiction titles from Toronto Public Library collections:

 

Count Frontenac / William Dawson LeSueur, 1909. Book. Adult Non-Fiction.

 

Count Frontenac and New France under Louis XIV / Francis Parkman, 1925, c1919. Book. Adult Non-Fiction.

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