Toronto Public Library Homepage

Fiction Feed

Teen Review - The Art of Not Breathing

March 17, 2017 | Teen Blogger | Comments (0)

Reviewed by Dawes Road Youth Advisory Group member Marilyn

The art of not breathing  by Sarah alexanderThe Art of Not Breathing, written beautifully by Sarah Alexander, is a lot like the Art of letting go. This book tells a story of a girl's best friend, her twin brother, in a devastating incident. Through all the challenges Elsie, the protagonist, and her family face she still tries to reach her brother and forever let go. Even after her brother was physically gone from her life, she always felt that he was right next to her at all times. Through struggles of growing up herself, Elsie starts to get used to bad habits after her brothers death. When she finds someone to show her a better passion of free- diving, her whole world changes, and she finds a way to reach her brother for one last time to say goodbye.

Continue reading "Teen Review - The Art of Not Breathing" »

Your Bookmark Here: The End of Oz

March 12, 2017 | Cameron | Comments (0)

In 2014 Danielle Paige introduced a new chapter in the Oz mythology; well researched and true to the originals, this new novel was about how Dorothy had returned to Oz and was ruining this magical place. Three years later and 7 novellas, 2 novels and we are finally  coming to the thrilling conclusion of what will Dorothy's fate be and will Amy Gumm successfully terminate her?

0062423770Over the scope of all the previous works comes the final chapter in this series. Amy has not been as successful as he had hoped at defeating Dorothy and her team and now she is under the firm grip of the Gnome King. Also some terrifying realities have been brought to light about the relationship between Kansas and Oz and what is really behind all the nefarious activities by the tyrants in the Emerald City.

To make matters worse Amy's arch-nemesis from Kansas, Madison, has shown up in Oz and Amy has to protect her as well as saver herself and Ozma from the Gnome king, get back to Oz and help the "Order of the Wicked" to save the magic that remains. However, Dorothy is driven by rage and out for revenge and she has a few tricks up her sleeve. Will Amy's inherited magic be enough to stop her? Can Oz ever return to the mythical and magical place it was before Dorothy ever arrived?

This is a page turning, jaw dropping, heart pounding of a conclusion. And if you are at all like this avid reader and fan of the series you will finish this book and return to the first one as there is so much you may have forgotten, or subtle hints that you didn't see. "The End of Oz" is available on May 14, 2017.

Place a hold on The End of Oz here. And keep a look out for the e-book coming soon.

Joyful page turners (book clubs for youth in Toronto)

March 9, 2017 | Cameron | Comments (0)

Many times young people and their love of reading gets ignored by more traditional book clubs or by the fear that the book club will be too much like a high school English class room. But that is not to say that youth do not enjoy a good read and an interesting and in-depth discussion of that book/poem/play/manuscript, etc.

Here are a few book clubs in Toronto that young people are welcome to attend and participate in.

 

The Young Adult Book Club in High Park


Index.aspx
This is a unique one as it is for youth but it is also an active book club where the group meet at Keele Station and then walk about in High Park and discuss the reading materials while they ramble around the park. The book club takes about an hour and includes a pit stop at Grenadier Cafe. The next date for this book club is March 11th and the book is "The Nightmarys" by Dan Poblocki, please visit the website for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

The Spectatorial Book Club


Index.aspxThere is a certain satisfaction in finding someone who’s equally passionate about a book as you, as willing to discuss the scenes you can’t get out of your mind or offer an alternative perspective on an event in the plot. Literature moves us, and as much as it is perfect for getting alone and cozy with a book, it is equally thrilling to sit with a group of people and bring these words to life.

The Spectatorial, the University of Toronto’s only speculative journal, has created a book club with specifically this thought in mind. Together, we will create an atmosphere where fellow bibliophiles can meet twice a month to discuss a curated selection of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and the many wonderful sub-genres of speculative literature. Books will range from fiction to poetry, novels to manga. Together, Ben Berman Ghan, the journal’s fiction editor, and Margaryta Golovchenko, the online editor, will alternate in selecting a different book each month for the club to discuss and enjoy.

With the abundance of books out there, it’s difficult sometimes to choose what to read, either because you’re not sure what you should be focusing on that’s considered to be foundational work, or maybe you’re hoping to find a diamond in the rough, something moving and under-appreciated. The Spectatorial Book Club’s goal is to present both classics in the speculative genre as well as lesser-known wonders, each month alternating between a book from one category to one from the other, thus facilitated by a different editor. Discussion can focus on literary and thematic aspects of works, the primary goal being to create an informal and comfortable atmosphere for sharing ideas and impressions.

Our first book is: Flowers for Algernon. If you own it, great! If not, borrow it from the Toronto Public Library. Ages 16+ welcome, and feel free to join our Facebook group to get the latest on meeting dates, topics and more about The Spectatorial!

Get: Flowers for Algernon from the library.

 

The Girly Book Club


Index.aspxThis book club is for females and it exists in many cities. The premise is to create a safe space for women who are like minded and share a passion for books and want to be able to talk about them in a friendly and familiar surrounding. All the different cities read the same book and then meet up at the end of the month to discuss the title at hand. This book club is for women of all ages and it also offers a chance to meet other women with similar interests, set an agenda, and start a global conversation.  This month the title is "The Pearl that Broke its Shell" by Nadia Hashimi and you can get the title from the library here as a physical book. Or here as an eBook.

 

 

 

A Room of Your Own - An Interactive Book Club for Girls


Index.aspxA Room of Your Own is an interactive book club targeted primarily at teen girls (13-18 years of age) of all races and ethnic backgrounds. Allowing them to express their curiosity, ambitions, hopes and frustrations, A ROOM OF YOUR OWN is a forum to share fun, feelings, and opinion with their peers and with their favorite authors. This new generation book club that will be 60 minutes in length and be once a month. The book club?s chief objectives are to have fun, and give teen girls what they need (and not what adults think they want). This fully interactive book club for teenage girls will discuss all subject matters that pertain to being young and maturing into adulthood via today's standards and pressures. This unique and innovative book club will choose a teen novel every month and discuss the subject matters of the story line and the relevance to teen girls? lives. This book club will not be intimidated by any subject matter! We will have the author present along with a specialist in the particular area of field that we are discussing. The novel will be a doorway into the lives of teen girls of all backgrounds. The March book is "The Scorpion Rules" by Erin Bow and they meet on Friday March 10th at Lillian H. Smith.

Get The Scorpion Rules here or get the eBook here.

 

Book Buzz . . . the buzz about books

170px-Longwaycover01The book buzz is an online meeting space for anyone to get together and discuss books from Toronto Public Library. Although not exclusively youth, there are many youth members who comment and get involved regularly. The only difference here is that this book club is online and there are no physical meet ups. This online book club will be great for people who don't have a lot of time to get out to physical meetings, but still want to be involved in a discussion about books. All you have to do is sign up with your email address and created user name.

Teen Review - The Free

February 28, 2017 | Teen Blogger | Comments (0)

Review by Fariha, with thanks to Helena at TPL for providing an ARC to read and review!

Release Date: February 28, 2017

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars

When you’re a thief, you’re also a liar. It comes with the territory.

The FreeThe Free by Lauren McLaughlin is about Isaac West, a high school teenager with a rough childhood, who landed himself in juvie for a month because he was caught stealing. We follow Isaac through his sentence and his experiences at juvie: the good, the bad and the wishes to just get out of there.

I thought I’d turn to the “Things I Liked” and “Things I Didn’t Like” list that I haven’t done in quite a while for this review.

Things I Liked:

**I really loved Isaac’s love for his sister and everything he was willing to do for her. Isaac was an alright character throughout the novel but I loved this certain aspect of him. We don’t see nearly enough siblings in YA, especially ones who have a good relationship with each other.

**I’m quite glad that there was no romance in here. I mean, there were references to sex and romantic partners but it was not a big deal throughout the novel.

Continue reading "Teen Review - The Free" »

Staff Picks from our Teen Email Newsletter

February 27, 2017 | Cameron | Comments (0)

Every once in a while a group of books come along that are all very well received by the critics. These are the books that we look forward to as we have a sense that we are getting something precious, something insightful, something that we will want to read and that will have that certain substance we are looking for. Here are four titles that have been very well received:

HateugiveThe Hate U Give, by Angie Thomas

Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, Angie Thomas’s searing debut about an ordinary girl in extraordinary circumstances addresses issues of racism and police violence with intelligence, heart, and unflinching honesty.
Kirkus says: "Thomas cuts to the heart of the matter for Starr and for so many like her, laying bare the systemic racism that undergirds her world, and she does so honestly and inescapably, balancing heartbreak and humor. With smooth but powerful prose delivered in Starr’s natural, emphatic voice, finely nuanced characters, and intricate and realistic relationship dynamics, this novel will have readers rooting for Starr and opening their hearts to her friends and family.This story is necessary. This story is important."

Place a hold on The Hate You Give, by Angie Thomas.

 

EverythingEverything Beautiful is not Ruined, by Danielle Younge-Ullman
Then
Ingrid traveled all over Europe with her opera star mother, Margot-Sophia. Life was beautiful and bright, and every day soared with music.
  Now
Ingrid is on a summertime wilderness survival trek for at-risk teens: addicts, runaways, and her. She’s fighting to survive crushing humiliations, physical challenges that push her to her limits, and mind games that threaten to break her.
 
Quill and Quire says: " . . . is an emotionally resonant, fabulously crafted novel about a young woman figuring out who she is and dealing with some seriously devastating events in her life. You don’t have to be 17 to empathize with Ingrid; her struggles are universal, even if her specific circumstances are not."

Place a hold on Everything Beautiful is Not Ruined, by Danielle Younge-Ullman, or read the eBook.
 
 
28763485The Sun Is Also A Star, by Nicola Yoon

  51fn0k84ZAL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_Girl Code: Gaming, Going Viral, and Getting It Done, by Andrea Gonzales

Perfect for aspiring coders everywhere, Girl Code is the story of two teenage tech phenoms who met at Girls Who Code summer camp, teamed up to create a viral video game, and ended up becoming world famous. The book also includes bonus content to help you get started coding!

 Kirkus says: "What brought the two together for their project was a desire to combine social commentary with their coding, resulting in their successful game. The game (and networking opportunities from GWC) has brought them attention and many more opportunities, but it also took more time and energy than they had to spare. By book’s end, they find themselves evaluating their futures with technology. The psychology of self-doubt and value of persistence are well-presented—the co-authors stress that the greater the frustration, the better the payoff. Tech-centered empowerment for those who feel voiceless. (coding appendix with glossary, sample code, resources) (Memoir. 12-17)"

Place a hold on Girl Code: Gaming, Going Viral and Getting It Done, by Andrea Gonzales.

 

Sign up for our teen email newsletter, where you'll find book suggestions, a sneak peek at programming and library events.

 

 

 

 

Staff Picks: Kill The Boy Band

February 26, 2017 | Alice | Comments (0)

Kill the boy bandBoy Bands and their rabid avid fans hold a special place among fans, and the narrator of this novel, a devotee of 80s movie and The Ruperts, is our tour guide into a group of crazy passionate fans known as Strepurs. She and her friends have got themselves close to their beloved quartet, when something goes awry, and they sort of accidentally kidnap one of them. Now what??

Continue reading "Staff Picks: Kill The Boy Band" »

Teen Review - King's Cage

February 15, 2017 | Teen Blogger | Comments (0)

Review by Sohinee

*Spoilers ahead*

King's cage coverKing's Cage by Victoria Aveyard, the third book in the Red Queen series, is probably so far the best in the series. The characters have developed so much and the story is more vibrant and electric and the author's writing flows like fine ink. Mare Barrow is no longer naive 16-year-old trying to save her best friend from getting conscripted. Now she is a woman wanting to go home to be with her family, wanting to be with the man she loves, and continuing to fight for what she believes in. Evangeline is no longer a cold-hearted b****, she's a sister trying to protect her brother from Mare's wrath. She is in love with a girl she cannot be with because she is a pawn on her father's chessboard. Maven isn't a boy king who betrayed everyone to be king, no, he's a tortured soul who can't tell right from wrong. The only person who stays disappointingly the same is Cal who makes promises he can't keep. Again chooses the crown over Mare. King's Cage is a fantastic read that I would recommend to anyone... but read the first two books first!

Read the ebook!

Butterflies: A Little Romance for Valentine's Day

February 14, 2017 | Alice | Comments (1)

Crush got you crazy? Characters in these books can definitely relate.

 

Guitar_notes_cover
Guitar Notes, by Mary Amato

 Lyla and Tripp alternate days in a coveted music practice room at school, and this sharing arrangements leads to a slightly cranky note, which leads to a conversation where the argumentative tone grows into banter, and then into real sharing. The two, who are pretty different, begin to open up and develop an emotional connection that turns into something real by the end of the book. It's a cute story, centered around music and connection and getting each other when others around them just don't, and a perfect light read for someone who enjoys the sweet side of romance more than the steamy.

 Place a hold on Guitar Notes, or read the ebook.

Continue reading "Butterflies: A Little Romance for Valentine's Day" »

Your Bookmark Here: We Are Okay

February 12, 2017 | Cameron | Comments (0)

WeareokayThis book had me by the cover. And I am not saying that you should judge a book by it's cover, but keep in mind that cover does a lot in selling the book. In Nina LaCour's new title (wonderfully being made to the public on valentines day) we have a beautiful and compelling tale of loss and sadness mixed with lies and betrayal.

It is the first school holiday since Marin started at college in New York leaving behind her life in California, all her friends, many of her possessions and full of secrets that no one knows. Not even her best friend Mable is aware of the baggage that she is carrying. As Marin sits and waits in her empty dorm for Mabel to arrive she begins to revisit and sift through the pieces of the past that she keeps tripping on.

Marin has allowed loneliness take up residence in her soul, but it is possible that the best thing for her is to tell the truth - or will that ruin her facade and actually turn her into a complete wreck?

This haunting novella weaves a tremendous tale and really engages you with the characters. This is a well received book and I can certainly understand why.

Place a hold on We Are Okay, by Nina LaCour.

Love Is Love: LGBTQ+ Valentine's Stories

February 11, 2017 | Alice | Comments (0)

Not every love story is a boy-meets-girl love story. Looking for a different pair of protagonists in your Valentine's read? Try one of these picks:

Ash_malindalo_500
Ash, by Malinda Lo

You think you know this story, but you’re wrong. Her name isn’t Cinderella, it’s Ash. And he isn’t just a prince, he’s a fairy prince. He and his kind are hunted by the King’s Huntress. When Ash and the Huntress meet in the woods, the two become friends, even though Ash hides the truth about her prince. Given the option to leave behind the horrible life she’s known, to live in the beautiful fairy Realm, what will Ash choose? The fairy prince who loves her, or the woman she is falling for?
Recommended for fans of fantasy, fairy tales, or The Wild Hunt.
Orientations/identities represented: lesbian.

Place a hold on Ash or read the ebook!

Continue reading "Love Is Love: LGBTQ+ Valentine's Stories " »

Anti-Valentine's: Recommended Reads for the Unromantic

February 9, 2017 | Amy | Comments (0)

Pink hearts everywhere. Candy that says “Be Mine, Valentine”. Pet names and mushy stuff. Maybe it just isn’t for you. So here’s a list of books we recommend that are romance-free-zones (at least 95% romance-free, anyway), with no love triangles in sight.

Steeplejack
Steeplejack
(A. J. Hartley)
High above the city, Ang works a dangerous job repairing chimneys, towers, and spires as a steeplejack. Death from a fall is a real possibility, and even the best of the best sometimes take a spill. So the death of Ang’s apprentice from an apparent fall isn’t that surprising. But when Ang finds out that her apprentice was murdered, the crime is overshadowed by the greatest theft her city has ever seen. Determined to unravel the mystery and find justice for her friend, it isn’t falling to her death that becomes the greatest danger to Ang…

This novel is hard to put down once you get started, full of action and excitement from the very beginning. Hopefully a sequel will be in store, too!

Recommended for fans of Parkour, bungee jumping, or girls who kick butt.

There’s also a short-story prequel, available as an eBook!

 

Continue reading "Anti-Valentine's: Recommended Reads for the Unromantic" »

Teen Review: A Tragic Kind of Wonderful

February 8, 2017 | Teen Blogger | Comments (0)

Review by Fariha, with "thanks a lot to HBG Canada for providing an ARC to read and review!"
Release Date: February 7, 2017
Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

Tragic kind of wonderfulA Tragic Kind of Wonderful follows Mel, a 16-year-old who is dealing with bipolar disorder. The novel explores how the mental illness affects her life and her experiences and her relationships.

I read this book right after reading History Is All You Left Me and I couldn’t ignore how similar the two novels are. They both contain peeks into the past as we get to see what happened before the books started, both explore mental illnesses (that perhaps don’t get as much recognition. Bipolar Disorder and OCD are not talked about or explored as much as some others, such as depression and anxiety), a lot of characters aren’t straight, and both main characters deal with losing a loved one. However, they’re both so incredibly different at the same time, in atmosphere and characters and how the story progresses.

Continue reading "Teen Review: A Tragic Kind of Wonderful" »

Teen Review - History Is All You Left Me

January 17, 2017 | Teen Blogger | Comments (0)

Review by Fariha, with thanks to "Helena at TPL for sending the ARC my way!"

Release Date: January 17, 2017

Rating: 4/5 stars

History is all you left me coverHistory Is All You Left Me follows Griffin as he mourns and tries to come to terms with the death of one of his best friends and his first love. There is guilt and the complex relationships at play, as well as the memories and the things left unsaid.

I read History Is All You Left Me for two weeks and a couple days. As a voracious reader, it is unlikely that I take even a week to read a single book and yet, I read this book over a long period of time and I think I enjoyed it more for it. I feel so connected to the story as it has been actively taking up a part of my mind for the better part of a month and this story is one that will stay with me for a long while yet.

Continue reading "Teen Review - History Is All You Left Me" »

Teen Review - The Boy Most Likely To

January 14, 2017 | Teen Blogger | Comments (0)

Review by Rifa, member of the Cedarbrae Youth Advisory Group

The boy most likely to coverThe Boy Most Likely To by Huntley Fitzpatrick is a young adult contemporary novel that focuses on Tim Mason’s and Alice Garrett’s story. I anticipated this book to be a light-hearted romance that focused on the relationship between the two main characters. However, this book was much more than that and actually brought up quite a bit of serious topics. In this story we deal with two different perspectives. The first one is Tim who is an alcoholic, abuses drugs, gets kicked out of his home and has an unexpected surprise coming at him a little bit after the beginning of the book. The second perspective is Alice, a girl who struggles to take care of her large family while her dad is in the hospital recovering from an injury.

Continue reading "Teen Review - The Boy Most Likely To" »

Teen Review - Never Always Sometimes

January 12, 2017 | Teen Blogger | Comments (0)

Review by Tasmi, member of the Cedarbrae Youth Advisory Group

Never always sometimes coverJulia and Dave are longterm best friends that are just about to start their freshmen year in high school. But they aren’t your typical cliché best friends that will end up being a quarterback of the football team, or the cheerleading captain and grow apart like other high schoolers. Right before they embark on their journey towards the next four years of high school, they write a Never List, that includes all the cliché things you could do, and vow to never do any of them. Some of the rules are like, #5 Never dye your hair the colour of rainbows, or #7 Never hook up with a teacher. But of course, rules are meant to be broken, as Dave broke rule #8 Never pine silently after someone for the eternity of high school. 

Continue reading "Teen Review - Never Always Sometimes" »

Teen Review - Six of Crows

January 3, 2017 | Teen Blogger | Comments (0)

Review by Fariha

Six of crows coverWe are all someone’s monster.

Leigh Bardugo just became one of those authors whose shopping lists I’d read with this book. While I enjoyed Bardugo’s Shadow and Bone, it did not affect me as emotionally as Six of Crows has. Six of Crows is about a heist crew with an impossible mission but there is no better group of misfits fit for the job.

None of the characters here are good, per se. They are greedy, they are recklessly ambitious, they are very much morally ambiguous, sometimes they are cruel, everybody has a past that made them that way and the readers can get behind their goals and, despite the characters’ flaws. Leigh Bardugo clearly has a gift for creating dark, scheming, lovable characters who are not heroes but the readers cheer them on despite that.

I was going to talk about a favourite character here but then realized that I simply cannot choose. I’d have a better luck choosing a single favourite book than a favourite character from this book. What does that say?

What is the easiest way to steal a man’s wallet?

Knife to the throat?

Gun to the back?

Poison in his cup?

You’re all horrible.

The easiest way to steal a man’s watch is to tell him you’re going to steal his watch.

Inej is the purest of them all and I love her. Kaz is one greedy bastard but I love how clever he is. I approve of 0% of Jesper’s actions but I want to give him a hug. Wylan needs a hug because reasons. Nina’s sassy confidence is unforgettable and her mistakes only make her human. I LIVE for Matthias’ character development. I love them all so much.

Continue reading "Teen Review - Six of Crows" »

Top Ten Teen Holds of 2016

December 27, 2016 | Debbie | Comments (0)

Want to know the hottest books of 2016? Well, a lot of great teen books were published in 2016 and we've rounded up the most popular for you. These were the top ten placed on hold at Toronto Public Library this year. These books are in hot demand, so place your holds now!

The Crown The Glass Sword United as One Lady Midnight The Last Star


Court of Mist and Fury Torch Against the Night The Fever Code Stars Above Raven King

  1. The Crown, by Kiera Cass (ebook)
  2. Glass Sword, by Victoria Aveyard (ebook)
  3. United as One, by Pittacus Lore (ebook)
  4. Lady Midnight, by Cassandra Clare (ebook)
  5. The Last Star, by Richard Yancey (ebook)
  6. A Court of Mist and Fury, by Sarah Maas (ebook)
  7. A Torch Against the Night, by Sabaa Tahir (ebook)
  8. The Fever Code, by James Dashner (ebook)
  9. Stars Above: A Lunar Chronicles Collection, by Marissa Meyer (ebook)
  10. The Raven King, by Maggie Stiefvater (ebook)

Your Bookmark Here: Shooter by Caroline Pignat

December 7, 2016 | Analisa | Comments (0)

ShooterIn Shooter, five grade 12 students find themselves trapped inside the boys’ washroom during a school lockdown. The group couldn't be more different or more annoyed with each other. As the lockdown prolongs the students quickly realize the severity of their situation; there is real danger that lurks outside of the washroom door and there is also a real need for them to trust each other in order to survive this.

Told from the perspective of each of the five students, through narration, journals and text messages, Pignat reveals that typically typecast characters often have so much more back story than what is usually perceived.  What's more is that she reveals what can happen when the characters lose their judgements of each other and instead work towards keeping each other alive.

The book is well paced, and the characters in the story are believable and nuanced. It has also been nominated for the 2017 Red Maple Fiction Award. Check out our blog post of all the Red Maple nominees, complete with links to place your holds.

Place a hold on Shooter by Caroline Pignat, or read the ebook.

Your Bookmark Here: Enter Title Here by Rahul Kanakia

December 1, 2016 | Claire | Comments (0)

TitleWhat would you do to get into your university of choice?  Study hard?  Do volunteer work?  Design an app?  If you're trying to get into Stanford like Reshma Kapoor, you know that it might take a little something more than that.  Something spectacular.  Something that will set you apart from all the other top-of-their-school applicants.  A hook--something nobody else has.

Reshma's hook?  She's going to write a teen novel while still in high school.  And get it published.  By an actual publishing house.  She actually has an agent.  What could possibly go wrong?

I kept going back and forth while I was reading this book.  There were times when I found myself caught up in Reshma's energy, determination, and dirty schemes, and other times when I found myself starting to dislike her--she's kind of like Anakin Skywalker, a lot of potential but way too open to the dark side.  The author's webpage describes the book as a cross between Gossip Girl and House of Cards.  Who could resist?

Oh, and by the way?  If you like metafiction--walk, don't run, to your library shelves.  You can't get more meta than this one. 

Place a hold on Enter Title Here, by Rahul Kanakia.

The Trouble with YA Dystopian Novels Today – A Throne of Glass Review

December 1, 2016 | Teen Blogger | Comments (1)

Review by Azeeza, member of the Cedarbrae Youth Advisory Group

Throne of glass CoverLike many youth, my love for YA Dystopian novels took up much of my time and stopped me from exploring other genres of books. Dystopian novels were always so wonderful, why would I want anything else when I already knew what I liked? This ideology worked well for me until what I liked… wasn’t the same anymore. Dystopian novels are often advertised as belonging to the action/adventure genres. As a reader, this is what I had grown to expect and love. The thrill of your beloved characters facing deadly circumstances, the risks being taken and the uncertainty of what would happen next, never failed to capture me… until these elements fell second to one element: romance.

Continue reading "The Trouble with YA Dystopian Novels Today – A Throne of Glass Review" »

Teen Review - Red Queen

November 25, 2016 | Teen Blogger | Comments (0)

Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard

Reviewed by Sohinee

Red Queen coverA world with two races of people: one with red blood and one with silver blood. Silvers, high class people with different abilities. Reds, lower class people slaving away their lives to live and survive Silver cruelty. Mare Barrow, a thief and a Red girl trying to make ends meet. While trying to scrounge up money for her best friend to prevent him from being shipped off to the war, Mare falls into Silver hands as they discover she, a girl with Red blood, has Silver blood. Mare becomes betrothed to Prince Maven when her powers are discovered. She becomes split between who she is and what they are forcing her to become.

Continue reading "Teen Review - Red Queen" »

Teen Review - The Rose and the Dagger

November 24, 2016 | Teen Blogger | Comments (0)

The Rose and the Dagger by Renée Ahdieh
Reviewed by Fariha

The rose and the dagger coverFrom the stars, to the stars.

To be quite honest, I had high expectations for the ending of this duology and not all of them were quite met. However, it was still an enjoyable ride. So, 3.5 stars for the slightly-not-as-epic-as-one-would-hope, magical, lyrical conclusion to the Wrath and the Dawn duology.

The characters were awesome, once again. I loved them and watching their character developments come to an arc made me feel like a doting mother and a proud friend. I also love how some of the secondary characters from the first book had a larger part in the book, such as Irsa, and each character has their own story that intertwines with the main plot. Makes the characters and the world seem more alive, I find.

Give me a meaningful love or a beautiful death!

We also got to explore the magical aspects of the world, which was very interesting and curious. There are some cool things that had me very excited and even though we were given some information, I wanted some more history of how some of the magic came to be.

Continue reading "Teen Review - The Rose and the Dagger" »

Everything, Everything Movie In The Works

November 22, 2016 | Helena | Comments (0)

Everything Everything

As the saying goes, anticipation is half the fun.  In that spirit, have you heard the good news that a movie is in the works for Nicola Yoon's smash hit Everything, Everything?  It's set for August of next year and will star Hunger Games actor Amandla Stenberg.  You might also want to check out Nicola's latest book The Sun Is Also A Star which, again, is a hit with readers, currently sitting at #6 on the New York Times Best Seller List, and critics alike.  Be sure to check out both books!  

Ask Vivek: Recap

November 21, 2016 | E Writer in Residence 2016 — Vivek Shraya | Comments (0)

Ask Vivek - Recap

This, sadly, is my last post as E-Writer in Residence. It’s been such a gift to connect with you in person at various libraries and events, and online through your writing. I feel fortunate to have been given this opportunity to read (and listen) to your words. I am immensely grateful for your trust in me. That said, my last day isn’t until Friday, November 25, so please keep sending me your writing!

When I began this position, my inspiration for the “Ask Vivek” posts was centered around you—I wanted to ensure that my posts spoke to questions you had about writing and art. I also think there can be so much mystery and solitude around writing. My hope was these posts would provide information to help making writing feel more accessible to you. I also hoped these posts would provide you a sense of support. 

For this final post, I have compiled a list of tips and highlights from my previous posts.

  1. On art making: Art is a powerful means to connect with others who have had similar, and different, experiences—others who want to share their stories.
  2. On writing prompts: Having a central question as a prompt can be challenging but can also give your writing or project a direction, as your goal then becomes answering this question.
  3. On songwriting: Spend the time in developing your own sound by writing constantly. The more songs you write, the better your songs will get.
  4. On novel writing: There might be days when you write only one sentence. This is okay. More than okay! This is part of the process. The most important thing is that you are committed to the writing and will show up again tomorrow.
  5. On comic making: “Make something that excites you—something that you would want to read! It can be good to start small. Make a one- or two-page story, where you can play around with your style and storytelling, and see if it's an idea you like enough to spend more time on.”
  6. On writing poetry: Reading works by other poets was useful as it allowed me to see how other writers were using the form and breaking “the rules.”
  7. On dealing with rejection: I remind myself that rejection isn’t personal. There are many factors as to why certain things get chosen over others and many of these factors I have no control over.
  8. On writing about the personal: When possible, I try to write ethically. I change the names of individuals and settings. I change the description of individuals’ appearances.

This past week has been a hard week. But I feel especially inspired by writers like Lawrence Hill who are speaking out about the various injustices that are taking place in the world. Please let me know what is inspiring you this week in the comments!

Red Maple and White Pine 2017 Award Nominees

November 18, 2016 | Debbie | Comments (0)

The OLA (Ontario Library Association) has announced the nominees for the 2017 Red Maple and White Pine awards! In case you haven’t heard of them before, these two awards are part of the Forest of Reading Awards for Canadian books in various categories. In particular, Red Maple is for fiction aimed at grades 7-8 and White Pine is for fiction aimed at grades 9-12. Every year, over 250,000 readers take part in voting for the winning books.

If you want to participate and cast your vote, you need to get reading! So here are the nominated lists for this year.

Red Maple

Born With Flickers The Hill Lucky jonah MiNRS

Sea Change Shattered Glass Shooter Trouble is a Friend of Mine Unquiet Past

Born With: Erika and Gianni, by Lorna Schultz Nicholson

This is the second book in the One-to-One series by Clockwise Press.  The first book, Fragile Bones, was also a Red Maple honor book last year, and this relatively young Canadian publisher has a specific mission to publish high-quality YA and children’s books featuring themes of diversity, inclusion, and global awareness.

Flickers, by Arthur Slade (ebook)

The Hill, by Karen Bass

Lucky Jonah, by Richard Scrimger (ebook)

MiNRS, by Kevin Sylvester (ebook)

Sea Change, by Frank Viva

Frank Viva has had a wide-ranging career from genre-redefining picture books to New Yorker illustrations.  He runs a design firm, and he is currently working an adult fiction title about a typographer. Read the Globe and Mail review of Sea Change.

Shattered Glass, by Teresa Toten (ebook)

Shattered Glass and The Unquiet Past are both part of the Secrets series. The book is in the same format as the well-known Seven Sequels and Seven Prequels series.

Shooter, by Caroline Pignat (ebook)

Caroline Pignat's 2014 book Unspeakable was reviewed for our summer program Word Out and The Gospel Truth is on our historical fiction booklist. Read-alike This Is Where It Ends was a New York Times bestseller.

Trouble is a Friend of Mine, by Stephanie Tromly (ebook)

Trouble is a Friend of Mine was on our 2016 TPL Teens Summer Edition (TTSE) booklist. The sequel, Trouble Makes a Comeback, is on order.

The Unquiet Past, by Kelley Armstrong (ebook)

Shattered Glass and The Unquiet Past are both part of the Secrets series. The book is in the same format as the well-known Seven Sequels and Seven Prequels series.

 

White Pine

Calvin Dan vs Nature Emperor of Any Place Exit, Pursued by a Bear Fifteen Lanes

Orange Grove Rodent Scorpion Rules Thousand Nights Worlds of Ink and Shadow

Calvin, by Martine Leavitt (ebook)

Martine Leavitt’s previous titles include the CLA Young Adult Book Award winner My Book of Life by Angel.  Calvin was also on our 2016 TTSE booklist.

Dan vs. Nature, by Don Calame (ebook)

We reviewed Dan vs. Nature in our regular Your Bookmark Here series.

The Emperor of Any Place, by Tim Wynne-Jones (ebook)

This title was one of our 2016 TTSE Top Ten Local Reads. One of the library's teens wrote a book review, and we even created an author page for Tim Wynne-Jones.

Exit, Pursued by a Bear, by E.K. Johnston (ebook)

E.K Johnston's previous title Prairie Fire was on our summers reads list for 2015. Prairie Fire, itself, is a sequel to Story Of Owen  E.K. Johnston is the author of Star Wars: AhsokaStar Wars: Lost Stars and Star Wars: Bloodline, both by Claudia Gray, are also in this series.

Fifteen Lanes, by S.J. Laidlaw (ebook)

The Orange Grove, by Larry Tremblay (ebook)

Rodent, by Lisa J. Lawrence

The Scorpion Rules, by Erin Bow (ebook)

The Scorpion Rules is the current CLA Young Adult Book Award winner.  The sequel, Swan Riders, is now out.  Also, Erin Bow posted on the library's blog this past summer, as The Scorpion Rules was one of our 2016 TTSE Top Ten Local Reads. Her previous titles include Plain Kate and Sorrow’s Knot and are also award winners.

A Thousand Nights, by E.K. Johnston (ebook)

The follow up to A Thousand Nights is Spindle, which is now on order.

Worlds of Ink and Shadow, by Lena Coakley (ebook)

The previous book to Worlds of Ink and Shadow is Witchlanders.  Worlds of Ink and Shadow is about is about the Brontes and is considered historical fantasy. It was also on our 2016 TTSE booklist.  Other books about the Brontes are Always Emily by Michaela MacColl and World Within by Jane Eagland.

 

This award has been running for years, so check out all the amazing titles and winners of previous Red Maple and White Pine Awards. Happy Reading!

 

Post updated November 23, 2016.

Youth Hub Homework. My Curved Border

Sign up for our
teen email newsletter