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Strategic Plan: Create

Our Fragile Planet: Magazines to the Rescue

April 15, 2016 | Jeannette | Comments (4)

Display
Our Fragile Planet display at North York Central Library

It's Earth Month 2016 and the time has come to take seriously our impact on the planet. Toronto Public Library is happy to present the best of our collections on environmental education, geared to children, teens and adults. Watch for environmental displays in branches across the city and pick up some reading material. At the same time, please join us for Our Fragile Planet, our free environmental programming series. Learn about issues that impact our city, and what you can do to tread lightly on our planet.

 

Next Friday is Earth Day.

The library has been celebrating all month through the Our Fragile Planet environmental programming series and displays at the branches. The displays feature books, magazines and DVDs on topics such as conservation, recycling, sustainable living, gardening and more.The goal is to get people thinking about the environment and what we can do to make a difference.

While we should be thinking about the environment throughout the year, Earth Day is a great way to remind us of our impact on the natural world. Magazines are a great way to get us thinking about the issues. With thought-provoking articles and stunning images, it’s a good place to start.

Here are some magazines on the environment available at the library:

Canadian Field-Naturalist   Earth   Nature   On Nature

There are also wildlife magazines:

Audubon   BBC wildlife   Birding   Canadian Wildlife

Try growing your own vegetables or planting flowers to attract wildlife. Here are some gardening magazines:

Canadian Gardening   Garden Making   Mother Earth News   Ontario Gardener

Want to read something right now? The library has magazines available online through Zinio that can be read on your computer, tablet or phone: (Don’t know Zinio? Here’s a guide.)

Environment and wildlife magazines available online:

Audubon   Earth   National Geographic   Smithsonian

Gardening magazines online:

Better Homes and Gardens   Canadian Gardening   Garden Making   Mother Earth News

It’s always important to be mindful of how we impact the environment. So let’s take this chance to make a difference.

Free Science Events in Toronto for March 2016

March 1, 2016 | Jeannette | Comments (0)

The Science and Technology Department of North York Central Library compiles a monthly calendar of free science and applied science events in Toronto. Applied science includes health, gardening, pets and food; all subjects found in the department's collection. Here is the March calendar (PDF). 

March's highlights include:

Toronto Public Library also offers many free science and applied science events:

At the library, March's highlights include:

Can't attend a program or want to read more about the topics covered? Try some of these books:

How we'll live on Mars   Atmosphere   Outsmart diabetes 1-2-3   A doctor's guide to alternative medicine

Our daily poison   GIMP for absolute beginners   Bicycle repair manual   A visual guide to sushi-making at home

Exercise Your Talents in New & Exciting Ways

January 4, 2016 | Ann | Comments (2)

Exercise titles available at North York Central Library
The above image is licensed by nyphotographic.com under a Creative Commons license which permits the free use of the image.

The holiday season for 2015 has drawn to a close. Consider the next signpost to appear over the horizon on the proverbial road through life that reads, "Exercise." This is a daunting suggestion right after a delirious period of holiday binging and relaxing. 

The interesting aspect of this word is its dual nature--it can either describe a "thing" or an "action." An exercise, for instance, conveys a static description of tasks to be completed whereas the phrase to exercise reflects a dynamic expression of movement.

When the static state awakens into dynamic motion, this is what Robert Pirsig, an American writer and philosopher, defines as the concept of Quality (or the Metaphysics of Quality (MOQ) in his later works). Much like a resting muscle fiber anticipates a jolt of electricity to leap into action, this qualitative point represents a brief opportunity to leap into new terrains of thought and creativity. The concepts of past and future are stored as static memories and planned goals, respectively. The present moment is a small window in time to act, create, and live in full alertness.

Pirsig contrasts this dynamic state with its opposite--a busy mind occupied with regrets over past actions or anxiety over future situations yet to unfold. In other words, the mind is not focused on the present moment:

“We’re in such a hurry most of the time we never get much chance to talk. The result is a kind of endless day-to-day shallowness, a monotony that leaves a person wondering years later where all the time went and sorry that it’s all gone.”

“In a car you're always in a compartment, and because you're used to it you don't realize that through that car window everything you see is just more TV. You're a passive observer and it is all moving by you boringly in a frame. On a cycle the frame is gone. You're completely in contact with it all. You're in the scene, not just watching it anymore, and the sense of presence is overwhelming.”

Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Also take a moment to listen to a special (1974) interview by Connie Goldman with Robert Pirsig on CBC.  

The best way to appreciate this philosophical concept on Quality is to crack open his book, The Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance and escape with him and his young son on a journey through the world of metaphysics. 

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

Here are more life-affirming titles on philosophy for exercising the awakening mind:

Use philosophy to be happier: 30 steps to perfect the art of living Heads up philosophy The weight of things: philosophy and the good life The consolation of philosophy
  Philosophy: all that matters The best things in life: a guide to what really matters The cartoon introduction to philosophy, 1st ed. Stoicism and the art of happiness

For some readers who prefer a quick "pick me up" on self-motivation instead of longer detailed discussions on philosophical concepts, the psychology section offer suggestions on how to view the world in a fun and positive light:

Positive psychology for overcoming depression: self-help strategies for happiness, inner strength and well-being    One simple idea: how positive thinking reshaped modern life The positive dog: a fable about changing your attitude to be your best Kiss that frog: 12 great ways to turn negatives into positives in your life and work
A life worth living: contributions to positive psychology   Lift: becoming a positive force in any situation Pursuing the good life: 100 reflections on positive psychology Hardwiring happiness: the new brain science of contentment, calm, and confidence

Once the mind is awakened to think beyond the mental sludge of everyday schedules, projects, and routines, consider expending this energy in new inspirational ways. The authors listed below have documented their own adventures in the world:

Long way down Climbing the seven summits: a comprehensive guide to the continents' highest peaks Golf freek: one man's quest to play as may rounds of golf as possible for free The adventures of Henry Thoreau: a young man's unlikely path to Walden Pond
Backpacking with the saints: wilderness hiking as spiritual practice Zen and the way of the sword: arming the samurai psyche Solo, yet never alone: swimming the Great Lakes What I talk about when I talk about running - a memoir

If you are ready to delve into a new terrain, learn the latest skills to be competitive in today's job force, or improve your current skills but do not know where to start, the Toronto Public Library website offers a superb selection of databases with a wealth of information. Some useful topics include: 

Ancestry Library Edition
Ancestry
Business Writing
Business Writing
Career Cruising
Career Cruising
Chilton's Auto Repair
Chilton's Auto Repair
Learning Express Library
Learning Express
Lynda.com
Lynda.com
Mango Languages
Mango Languages
Study Skills Success
Study Skills Success

Ancestry (In-Library use only) is a popular genealogy resource that includes U.S., Canadian, European, Australian, and New Zealand records. Specific topics include census, birth, marriage, death, immigration, military records and more. Ancestry offers a great opportunity to access records essential to building your family tree.

Business Writing offers an opportunity to sharpen your writing skills in various forms of business correspondence such as writing letters, reports, and emails. This resource would benefit those who plan to work in a business environment and need to communicate effectively to clients and staff.

Career Cruising enables you to preview a career and see whether this profession suits your personality. The career guidance resource offers career profiles and links to relevant Canadian college and university programs and also includes a Canadian Job Search section.

Chilton's Auto Repair is a useful database for looking up repair manuals, maintenance schedules, service bulletins and Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) test prep quizzes. If Robert Pirsig could repair his own motorcycle with Zen-like grace, imagine an increase in self-confidence while changing the oil or replacing the brake pads on your vehicle. 

Learning Express Library offers practice tests and answers for all ages. LSAT, MCAT, GMAT, SAT, GED, Canadian citizenship practice test, TOEIC, TOEFL iBT, math, grammar, writing and more are available here. This is a chance to practice writing the entry tests and determine how prepared you are before applying. For those who just enjoy testing their many skills, this would be a good resource to use.

Lynda.com is a new database that offers over 3,500 video tutorial courses led by experts on web design, software development, photography, business skills, home and small office, project management, 3D + Animation, graphic design audio, music, video editing and more. This resource requires the creation of a personal account which will allow you to track your progress through your tutorials and offers certificates of program completion that you could proudly post on your LinkedIn account.

Mango Languages offers an opportunity to practice and converse in new languages or to improve your spoken English. The online "cue cards" provide audio and visual interaction with the interface to develop these skills effectively. If you want to feel more confident conversing with people in a different country, this resource will help you on your way.

Study Skills Success offers high school and college student skills on how to do research, write term papers and essays. This database also offers practice tests with answers.  If your aim is to improve your studying skills, then this resource will nicely dovetail with your goal.

Enjoy the New Year by living every single second in the present. Inspire yourself to exercise your talents in new and exciting ways each and every moment in life.

Free Science Events in Toronto for January 2016

December 29, 2015 | Jeannette | Comments (0)

The Science and Technology Department of North York Central Library compiles a monthly calendar of free science and applied science events in Toronto. Applied science includes health, gardening, pets and food; all subjects found in the department's collection. Here is the January calendar (PDF).

January's highlights include:

The Toronto Public Library also offers many free science and applied science events:

At the library, January's highlights include:

  • January 12: Food Junkies: The Truth About Food Addiction, at North York Central Library. Dr. Vera Tarman will discuss her book which focuses on the experiences of people coping with various forms of food addiction, and provides readers with practical information grounded in medical science.
  • January 25: Could Life Exist on Other Worlds?, at Annette Street branch. Using what we know about life on Earth, Lauren Hetherington explains how life could exist elsewhere in the universe and how we can look for it.
  • January 26: Arduino Meetup, at Scarborough Civic Centre branch. Arduino is a tool for making computers that can sense and control more of the physical world than your desktop computer. Come and meet like-minded open-source advocates, chat and create with other makers.
  • January 27: Meals on a Budget, at Leaside branch. Learn how to prepare meals on a budget, shop for deals, and minimize waste. Participants will create their own money saving strategies and take home sample homemade goods.
  • January 29: The Drug Discovery Process: From Benchtop to Pillbox, at Don Mills branch. Ever wonder how drugs evolve from basic ideas to medical treatments and why the process is so long? In this talk the transition of a scientific finding to clinical trials will be discussed, answering questions such as who pays for drug development and how do we know these drugs are safe?

Can't attend a program or want to read more about the topics covered? Try some of these books:

Wonders of the winter landscape   Invasive plants   Mr. Jefferson and the giant moose   Food junkies

Life beyond earth   Arduino for beginners   The affordable feasts collection   The future of drug discovery

 

The Best Cookbooks of 2015

December 24, 2015 | Jeannette | Comments (0)

It's that time of the year again. I'm back with another post about the best cookbooks of the year. 

Just like the 2014 and 2013 posts, below are some of the best cookbooks of the year chosen by various sources (click on their name to view the full list and the reviews):

Booklist:

The Cuban table   How to cook everything fast   Indian for everyone   My kitchen year

Bon Appétit:

Bien cuit   The food lab   Near and far   New sugar and spice

The Globe and Mail:

A girl and her greens   The food of Oman   Olympia provisions   True north

Epicurious:

The broad fork   Lucky Peach presents 101 easy Asian recipes   Mamushka   Zahav

Vogue:

Milk bar life   Oyster   The Larousse book of bread   Brodo

Do you have an e-reader, tablet or smart phone? You can read some of this year's favourite in e-book format:

The gluten-free revolution   My pantry   Gjelina   This is Camino

The NoMad cookbook   Sweet goodness   Tacos   The chili cookbook

The Mission Chinese Food cookbook   Root to leaf   At home in the whole food kitchen   The baking bible

Happy reading, happy eating, Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

Alternative Holiday Activities!

December 7, 2015 | Emoke | Comments (0)

Healing with the ArtsDecember is the month of holidays. Christmas songs and decorations most obviously bombard us and take over. But what if you don't enjoy the holidays, or do not observe any of them?

If this is the time of year for you where you need a good distraction more than anything, I thought I would find some alternative activities for you to get you through the month!

The following will be my personal suggestions, and other ideas I have come across. If you follow my blogs, you will not be surprised that the first thing I can think of is to get out of town! Avoid the holiday shopping madness and escape to an exotic destination, not to spend a specific holiday with anyone, but just for your own personal enrichment. Perhaps take an exciting "alternative holiday" where you volunteer and give back to a specific group or community. I will recommend books at the bottom of this post from the library that can be borrowed with specific ideas for destinations.

Other activities you can enjoy are winter sports! Such as skiing, snowboarding, or my favourite; ice skating.

The other activity that I have personally started getting into is the adult colouring trend. I now own all of Johanna Basford’s books: Secret Garden, Enchanted Forest, and Lost Ocean. She is a Scottish illustrator who uses pens and pencils to create illustrations, predominantly in black and white outlines, which can be coloured in with pencils, crayons, thin markers, or pens. The drawings are very intricate and detailed, and the act of colouring in her drawings, finishing them or adding to them yourself or finding hidden treasures among them is completely therapeutic (at least for me). There has been some fuss in the media over her books, and art therapists have recommended the act of colouring to soothe nerves and lessen anxiety, tension, and stress.

This is a completely addictive activity (if you like this sort of thing and enjoy creative activities). I can see the holiday season being the perfect time to stay at home and stock up on these books (and other adult colouring books on the market) and quietly colour to your heart's content while others are busy pushing through the huge holiday crowds at the malls.

I hope you find these suggestions helpful to get through the month of December. These are just my personal suggestions, but please feel free to share in the comments below some of your personal favourites! Whatever you end up doing this time of year, stay warm and enjoy!

Daniel Rotsztain is a freelance artist, writer, and cartographer. Throughout 2015, Rotsztain visited every public library in Toronto and illustrated their exteriors, releasing the collection online. 

And please see the following related materials that can be borrowed from Toronto Public Library. 

     

The ethical travel guide  Hands-on holidays  Snow travel  Let it snow

  Healing with the arts  Art therapy and creative coping techniques for older adults  Volunteer vacations in Latin America  Wide open world how volunteering around the globe changed one family's lives forever

Citizenship/Settlement Programs at North York Central Library!

October 26, 2015 | Emoke | Comments (0)

Pass the Canadain Citizenship TestThe Toronto Public Library offers a vast variety of New to Canada and Citizenship Test Preparation classes and programs on an ongoing basis. The library website under New To Canada is a good place to look for information on: Learning English for all levels and ages, Citizenship Test, Settling in Toronto, Jobs, Training & Certification, Materials in Your Language, Your Library Card, and so on.

You can also do a search on the library website using the words "Citizenship" and you will find all the many library programs and classes and other materials and information and recommended websites that will help you with citizenship information.

The Citizenship Test Section of the website has some sample questions and answers and links to the booklet to help you study for the Citizenship test: Discover Canada. There is also a link to Learning Express Library, a database you can use with your library card even from home, with more citizenship tests.

The third floor of the North York Central Library usually keeps free copies of Discover Canada to hand out, and various other libraries also have copies to loan out or for use in the library only.

The Society and Recreation Department also has three major Citizenship/Settlement Programs: New to Canada? Speak to a Costi Representative!, Canadian Citizenship Test Preparation (name changing to: Canadian Citizenship Information in 2016) and Discover Canada Citizenship Mentoring Circle.

The first program, New to Canada? Speak to a Costi Representative! is held once a month, on the last Friday of the month. At the library sessions, a COSTI representative will answer your questions about employment, education, health, housing, and settling into your new environment. COSTI Immigrant Services is a community-based multicultural agency which has been serving all immigrant communities and new Canadians for many years. Some of the topics of the most interest to newcomers are: finding a job, family sponsorship, continuing education at secondary and post-secondary levels, improving English, residency requirements to maintain permanent resident status, applying for citizenship, maintaining OHIP coverage, and OAS pension eligibility

Fridays, October 30th, November 27th, 2015 (1 p.m.- 2 p.m. in Farsi, 2 p.m.- 3 p.m. in English), North York Central Library Room 2/3. Free. Drop In.

And for next year:

Fridays, January 29th, February 26th, and March 25th, 2016 (1 p.m.- 2 p.m. in Farsi, 2 p.m.- 3 p.m. in English), North York Central Library Room 2/3. Free. Drop In.

The second program, Canadian Citizenship Test Preparation (name changing to: Canadian Citizenship Information in 2016) involves a representative from the Toronto District School Board discussing what it means to be a citizen, what to expect from the test, and how to prepare using the Discover Canada guide. You must bring your Permanent Resident card to the session.

In December, North York Central Library is having its last program called Canadian Citizenship Test Preparation. It will be on Tuesday, December 15th, 2015 at 6 p.m.- 8 p.m. in the Auditorium at the North York Central Library. Register at 416-395-5660.

In the new year, instead of this one 2-hour session, North York Central Library will be dividing this program in two and having two 2-hour sessions. They will be:

CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP INFORMATION

PART ONE: THE CITIZENSHIP APPLICATION PROCESS

Learn about the Canadian citizenship application process. Find out the latest information about eligibility (age, residency requirements, proof of language ability etc.), completing and submitting the forms, fees, application processing times and more. Presented by a Toronto District School Board representative. You must bring your Permanent Resident Card. It will be held on Wednesday, January 27th, 2016 at 6 p.m.- 8 p.m. in the Auditorium of the North York Central Library. Register at 416-395-5660.

CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP INFORMATION

PART TWO: CITIZENSHIP TEST PREPARATION

Learn about the Canadian citizenship knowledge test. Get study tips and try some practice questions based on the Discover Canada study guide. Presented by a Toronto District School Board representative. You must bring your Permanent Resident card. It will be held on Wednesday, February 24th, 2016 at 6 p.m.- 8 p.m. in the Auditorium of the North York Central Library. Register at 416- 395-5660.

The third program, Discover Canada Citizenship Mentoring Circle, is 10 weeks long and is currently running. The dates for this year are:

Mondays, September 14th to November 23rd (except Monday October 12th), Room 1, North York Central Library. All sessions run from 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Even though the program has started, you may still join in.

The dates for 2016 are: Mondays, January 18th to April 4th, 2016 (except February 15th and March 28th), Room 1, North York Central Library. All sessions run from 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

In these sessions, you will review and discover the Discover Canada study guide with a CultureLink staff member and a team of trained Citizenship Education mentors. Every participant is matched with one mentor. Newcomers can improve their vocabulary and boost their confidence in speaking English by participating in conversations on various topics. Paricipants can also connect with local volunteers, network and share experiences and stories.

Provided by CultureLink. Free. To register, contact Hashem Rahin at 416-588-6288 x220 or hrahin@culturelink.ca

I hope you will find these sessions helpful and useful and that they help you pass your Citizenship Test and settle into Canada in a positive and successful manner!

May Days Are For Parties, Weddings, and Travel

May 11, 2015 | Ann | Comments (2)

Spring arrives with bright floral colours and the sun's warm glow across the land. Temperatures rise as the days grow longer. To celebrate the upcoming summery weather enjoy this time outdoors. What better way to shake off the winter blues than to throw an outdoor party for family and friends. Here are some colourful suggestions:

Fairy parties:  recipes, crafts, and games for enchanting celebrations by Colleen Mullaney Sleepover party!:  games and giggles for a fun night by Jamie Kyle McGillian Kids parties by Lisa Atwood The party book by Jane Bull
Let's party! by Alison Bell The kids' pick-a-party book: 50 fun themes for happy birthdays and other parties by Penny Warner Sleeping over by Melinda Beth Radabaugh Costume parties: planning a party that makes your friends say "wow!" by Jen Jones

Not only is this season a grand way for children to enjoy outdoor festivities, this season is also a way to celebrate a new life of love and happiness. Weddings need not be expensive to be glamourous, unique, and special. Have a look at the following title suggestions to see how to design a wedding of a lifetime. 

Style me pretty weddings: inspiration & ideas for an unforgettable celebration by Abby Larson Weddings by Hilary Sterne The Knot complete guide to weddings: the ultimate source of ideas, advice & relief for the bride & groom & those who love them by Carley Roney Wedding style:   hundreds of tips and secrets from the professionals for styling your own big day
Plan the perfect wedding on a small budget by Elizabeth Lluch The broke-ass bride's wedding guide by Dana LaRue Wedding expert: 400 things you need to know to plan your big day by Bettie Bradley 1000 best wedding bargains by Sharon Naylor

For those who want to travel beyond their workplace to see the flourishing flora and fauna in a cool northern terrain, why not head off into the Canadian wilderness. Experience the natural quietude that many artists and writers derive their artistic inspiration from. Here are some titles that will take you far and wide across our home and native land: 

Dazed but not confused: tales of a wilderness wanderer by Kevin Callan Trails and tribulations: confessions of a wilderness pathfinder by Hap Wilson Chasing Clayoquot: a wilderness almanac by David Pitt-Brooke Paddlenorth: adventure, resilience, and renewal in the Arctic wild by Jennifer Kingsley
The great Central Canada bucket list: one-of-a-kind travel experiences by Robin Esrock Canada's road: a journey on the Trans-Canada Highway from St. John's to Victoria by Mark Richardson Dutch gentlemen adventurers in Canada, 1811-1893 by Herman Ganzevoort and J. Th. J. Krijff More trails, more tales: exploring Canada's travel heritage by Bob Henderson

Enjoy the blossoming of warmer days ahead by taking the time to celebrate life, love, and landscapes at their finest.  

Homelessness In Canada

March 16, 2015 | Emoke | Comments (14)

Healing homeRecently, I attended a training session on homelessness which opened my eyes to the topic and the actions that we must take as a society to put an end to this unfortunate and inhumane social issue. The speaker was Stephen Gaetz, a Professor at the Faculty of Education at York University and the Director of the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness and the Homeless Hub. He is also the President of Raising the Roof, a leading Canadian charity that focuses on long term solutions to homelessness.


Here are some facts that I learned from his lecture (statistics are rough estimates):

  • Over 235,000 Canadians experience homelessness in a year
  • 35,000 people a night are homeless
  • 47.5% are single adult men (25-55 years old)
  • Living on the streets is unsafe for women as family violence is a major reason women are homeless
  • Youth 16-24 years old make up 20% of the homeless population. The causes are unique and include abuse, low income from minimum wage jobs and lack of affordable housing
  • In Toronto, 18% of homeless are Aboriginal
  • New Canadians are a growing homeless population

Homelessness as a Problem:

  • Society created the homelessness problem
  • High paying jobs are disappearing
  • Incomes have declined at the same time as increasing housing prices
  • There is a focus on tax credits in Canada - instead of spending more directly on childcare for instance
  • Reductions in welfare payments
  • Wages haven't kept up with inflation
  • From 1980s-1990s, the government reduced spending on affordable housing to balance the budget
  • National investment in housing decreased (including rental)
  • Rise in homelessness in 1990s was a result of shifts in government policy

Causes of Homelessness

  • Family conflict, job loss, accidents (disability), mental health and addiction
  • Racism, discrimination and homophobia 
  • Patients that are discharged from hospitals without any support or guidance
  • Less rehabilitation programs

Myth: people choose to be homeless - most leave home (or a desperate situation) not because they want to but due to a violent situation, sexual abuse, etc.

  • When they leave, they lose everything: family, natural supports, friends and guidance from relatives
  • Health worsens- mental health impacted, depression, disease, nutritionally vulnerable
  • Addictions follow to “numb the pain”
  • Sexual exploitation arises especially for women on the streets that need to make some money
  • Gangs and criminal involvement increases - for self-protection and to feed a drug habit
  • Homeless are victims of crime as whatever little they own is stolen on the streets, shelters, etc.
  • 38% of young homeless women were sexually assaulted in the past year

Canadian Response to Homelessness should be:

Prevention
Emergency Response
Housing and Supports

  • We have come to rely on emergency services too much
  • What we really need are prevention and housing supports
  • Alberta - is way ahead of Ontario on homelessness as they have a provincial strategy to end homelessness
  • Medicine Hat has virtually ended homelessness as the city has invested in affordable housing

Ending Homelessness

What is Toronto Public Library Doing:

  • Toronto Public Library has partnered with Toronto Public Health and the City of Toronto’s Streets to Homes to launch a pilot program. The program is currently available two days per week at Toronto Reference Library and Yorkville branch
  • Toronto Public Health nurses help people connect to health resources for mental health and addiction
  • Nurses rove around these branches, checking in with security and librarians about what help is needed

Bookmobile Outreach to Family Shelters

  • Bookmobile outreach and storytimes at Toronto shelters serve women with children
  • Staff register library cards for kids and residents enabling them to borrow books from the bookmobile for extended loan periods
  • Shelter residents don’t get fines and can return books in their shelter

 

The Toronto Reference Library will also have a program in April with Stephen Gaetz as part of their Thought Exchange programming :

 

For more information about this important issue, please see the following books, which can be borrowed from the Toronto Public Library:

Homelessness & Health in Canada  Youth work  Homelessness  Homelessness, housing and the experiences of mental health consumer-survivors

Almost home  Homeless  Children living in transition  Homelessness comes to school

DVDs:

Home safe. Toronto a documentary

Crowe, Cathy, 1952-; MacDonald, Laurel; Sky, Laura; Strong, Phil

Year/Format: 2009, DVD, 1 videodisc (96 min.)

Additional reading:

Youth homelessness in Canada: implications for policy and practice

Housing first in Canada: supporting communities to end homelessness

The State of Homelessness in Canada 2014  (PDF)

Digital Innovation Hub Librarian Internship Experience!

February 2, 2015 | Emoke | Comments (7)

Emoke at Digital Innovation Hub
Photo of me at the Toronto Reference Library Hub

Recently I finished a librarian internship at the Digital Innovation Hub at the Toronto Reference Library. I had the honour of spending about five months there, getting to know what goes on in the hub and learning how to do my own 3D printing along with figuring out the other software that customers use there, such as Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, and MakerWare, to name a few!

The Digital Design Technician staff and others who work at the hub are knowlegeable  about 3D Design, 3D printing, website design, Adobe software and the Asquith Press self publishing book machine services. I learned a lot from them by shadowing their public Digital Design Classes and generally running around the hub watching and listening to how they are helping customers and asking them a million questions along the way. 

This internship changed librarian work for me forever! For a few months, I was not answering reference questions or taking care of a collection of books, but instead; helping architects, engineers, students, inventors, designers, artists, and the general hobbyist or maker with their 3D printing and creative work. I was teaching 3D Printer Certification classes, helping out at the International Book Fair, Maker Faire, and a Hackathon event with the Ryerson Digital Media Zone and Penguin Books. I also helped anyone that walked by learn about the space and gave various group tours.

My time there was a wake-up call about the future direction libraries are heading in. Many customers asked me why the library of all places would have a Makerspace or tech lab. I always tried to answer as eloquently as possible, but really, the answer is pretty simple: the library world has to keep up with innovation, especially technological innovation and offer it in an accessible, helpful and educational way to the public, just like they have always done with computers, programs, and services. 

I was always quite proud of how impressed the public was that the library has a space for 3D printing, designing and printing your own books, and a whole slew of other nerdy techy equipment to help you with your work or play.

Enough said. Go see for yourself how awesome and techy the library has become!

The Innovation Hubs blog

Toronto Reference Library Digital Innovation hub

Fort York Library Digital Innovation hub

MakerBot Replicator 2

 3D Printer, MakerBot Replicator 2 in action!

3D Printing at the Library

 2 Makerbots at the Toronto Reference Library Digital Innovation Hub.

  3D Selfie
 
  3D Selfie, using the XBOX Kinect scanner and software

Side View

 Side view, 3D selfie!

 

Please browse through some books and ebooks the library has to offer about libraries and technological innovation, and digital innovation in general!

The Embedded Librarian  Jump-Start Your Career as a Digital Librarian  Transformed Library

3D Printing  Make: 3D Printing  3D Printing for Dummies

3D Printing with Autodesk  3D Printing  Make: The Makerspace Workbench

Design & Modeling for 3D Printing  Makerspaces

illustrator Foundations  

ebook

Welcome to North York Central Library. We're one of the City's most welcoming spaces, open to all for study, research, relaxation and fun.

Our extensive digital and print collections, programs and services are yours to use, borrow and explore. Expert staff are always on hand to help. Meet us in person or join us online.