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Here Comes the Summer Solstice!

June 20, 2016 | Ann | Comments (2)

Mandala titles for your reading interest!
Photo courtesy of Bart Everson on Flickr under cc Generic 2.0 licence.

While temperatures soared above the 30 degree Celsius mark after Victoria Day on May 23rd, summer officially begins at 6:34 pm today. As the commuter traffic dwindles, the Summer Solstice pours through the City hurling us into hot and humid weather. Today starts the season of swimming pools, bug bites and scorching sunburns.

Here are some historically hot topics for you to glance through on your patio:

Indian summer: the secret history of the end of an empire Empire of the summer moon: Quanah Parker and the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history The long summer: how climate changed civilization Martian summer: robot arms, cowboy spacemen, and my 90 days with the Phoenix Mars Mission
Freedom summer: the savage summer that made Mississippi burn and made America a democracy Summer of '68: the season that changed baseball-- and America-- forever The summer of beer and whiskey: how brewers, barkeeps, rowdies, immigrants, and a wild pennant fight made baseball America's game Red heat: conspiracy, murder, and the Cold War in the Caribbean

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Today also celebrates the longest day of the year. From this day forward, daylight hours gradually shorten over time. Six months from today, on Wednesday, December 21st at 5:44 pm, the Winter Solstice will mark the shortest day of the year. From that day forward, daylight hours with increase again until the next Summer Solstice arrives to complete the cycle. In contrast, the Spring and Fall Equinox mark the period when daylight balances evenly with the nighttime hours because the sun is directly over the Earth's equator. Paige Williams' (2013) article provides a detailed understanding on how seasons occur as a result of how our planet is tilted. 

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As the Earth tilts favourably towards the Sun at different areas of the world, people gather to celebrate this day with food and festivities. Here are four articles on Summer Solstice celebrations from around the world:

  1. Top 10 Summer Solstice Celebrations Around the World by Huffpost Travel
  2. 5 summer solstice celebrations from around the world by Mashable.com
  3. 5 Ways to Celebrate the Summer Solstice Around the World by Care2.com
  4. 15 Summer Holiday Traditions from Around the World by Becky Ferreira

Or, you can create your very own Summer Solstice festivity from WikiHow.

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Enjoy these previous TPL blogs as the summer moves forward:

  1. Summer Awakens the Wandering Traveler
  2. UFO or Weather Balloon
  3. Elizabeth Posthuma Simcoe, 1762-1850
  4. Let's Go to the EX!

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While planning your fun in the City, have a look at the following websites:

  1. Toronto Hogspot Activities/Events/Fun
  2. City of Toronto - Special Events
  3. Toronto festivals and events calendar

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Summer would not be complete without some amazing activities for the children and family across the City. Thursday, June 30, 2016, the TD Summer Reading Club registration begins and the book reporting starts on Monday, July 4, 2016! The program runs all summer long and ends on Saturday, September 3, 2016. Children are encouraged to sign up, read books, join in on some amazing activities, and spend the best part of the summer learning and having fun.

Summer Reading Club 2016

Enjoy this day and every sun-drenched day that is available for the next three months. The weather can only get better from this point forward. No matter where you reside, the Summer Solstice arrives to bring joy and celebration all around.

Citizenship/Settlement Programs at North York Central Library!

October 26, 2015 | Emoke | Comments (0)

Pass the Canadain Citizenship TestThe Toronto Public Library offers a vast variety of New to Canada and Citizenship Test Preparation classes and programs on an ongoing basis. The library website under New To Canada is a good place to look for information on: Learning English for all levels and ages, Citizenship Test, Settling in Toronto, Jobs, Training & Certification, Materials in Your Language, Your Library Card, and so on.

You can also do a search on the library website using the words "Citizenship" and you will find all the many library programs and classes and other materials and information and recommended websites that will help you with citizenship information.

The Citizenship Test Section of the website has some sample questions and answers and links to the booklet to help you study for the Citizenship test: Discover Canada. There is also a link to Learning Express Library, a database you can use with your library card even from home, with more citizenship tests.

The third floor of the North York Central Library usually keeps free copies of Discover Canada to hand out, and various other libraries also have copies to loan out or for use in the library only.

The Society and Recreation Department also has three major Citizenship/Settlement Programs: New to Canada? Speak to a Costi Representative!, Canadian Citizenship Test Preparation (name changing to: Canadian Citizenship Information in 2016) and Discover Canada Citizenship Mentoring Circle.

The first program, New to Canada? Speak to a Costi Representative! is held once a month, on the last Friday of the month. At the library sessions, a COSTI representative will answer your questions about employment, education, health, housing, and settling into your new environment. COSTI Immigrant Services is a community-based multicultural agency which has been serving all immigrant communities and new Canadians for many years. Some of the topics of the most interest to newcomers are: finding a job, family sponsorship, continuing education at secondary and post-secondary levels, improving English, residency requirements to maintain permanent resident status, applying for citizenship, maintaining OHIP coverage, and OAS pension eligibility

Fridays, October 30th, November 27th, 2015 (1 p.m.- 2 p.m. in Farsi, 2 p.m.- 3 p.m. in English), North York Central Library Room 2/3. Free. Drop In.

And for next year:

Fridays, January 29th, February 26th, and March 25th, 2016 (1 p.m.- 2 p.m. in Farsi, 2 p.m.- 3 p.m. in English), North York Central Library Room 2/3. Free. Drop In.

The second program, Canadian Citizenship Test Preparation (name changing to: Canadian Citizenship Information in 2016) involves a representative from the Toronto District School Board discussing what it means to be a citizen, what to expect from the test, and how to prepare using the Discover Canada guide. You must bring your Permanent Resident card to the session.

In December, North York Central Library is having its last program called Canadian Citizenship Test Preparation. It will be on Tuesday, December 15th, 2015 at 6 p.m.- 8 p.m. in the Auditorium at the North York Central Library. Register at 416-395-5660.

In the new year, instead of this one 2-hour session, North York Central Library will be dividing this program in two and having two 2-hour sessions. They will be:

CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP INFORMATION

PART ONE: THE CITIZENSHIP APPLICATION PROCESS

Learn about the Canadian citizenship application process. Find out the latest information about eligibility (age, residency requirements, proof of language ability etc.), completing and submitting the forms, fees, application processing times and more. Presented by a Toronto District School Board representative. You must bring your Permanent Resident Card. It will be held on Wednesday, January 27th, 2016 at 6 p.m.- 8 p.m. in the Auditorium of the North York Central Library. Register at 416-395-5660.

CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP INFORMATION

PART TWO: CITIZENSHIP TEST PREPARATION

Learn about the Canadian citizenship knowledge test. Get study tips and try some practice questions based on the Discover Canada study guide. Presented by a Toronto District School Board representative. You must bring your Permanent Resident card. It will be held on Wednesday, February 24th, 2016 at 6 p.m.- 8 p.m. in the Auditorium of the North York Central Library. Register at 416- 395-5660.

The third program, Discover Canada Citizenship Mentoring Circle, is 10 weeks long and is currently running. The dates for this year are:

Mondays, September 14th to November 23rd (except Monday October 12th), Room 1, North York Central Library. All sessions run from 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Even though the program has started, you may still join in.

The dates for 2016 are: Mondays, January 18th to April 4th, 2016 (except February 15th and March 28th), Room 1, North York Central Library. All sessions run from 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

In these sessions, you will review and discover the Discover Canada study guide with a CultureLink staff member and a team of trained Citizenship Education mentors. Every participant is matched with one mentor. Newcomers can improve their vocabulary and boost their confidence in speaking English by participating in conversations on various topics. Paricipants can also connect with local volunteers, network and share experiences and stories.

Provided by CultureLink. Free. To register, contact Hashem Rahin at 416-588-6288 x220 or hrahin@culturelink.ca

I hope you will find these sessions helpful and useful and that they help you pass your Citizenship Test and settle into Canada in a positive and successful manner!

Healthy Cognitive Aging

June 8, 2015 | Jane | Comments (0)

As baby boomers approach old age, and as we’re living longer, topics like brain health and prevention of age-related cognitive decline are making headlines, but also a matter we come across in our personal lives. The brain is at the centre of everything we do, who we are, what we make of our lives, so of course we care, and of course we want to learn as much as we can.

A great start would be to come to a talk at by Ryerson professor Dr. Alexandra Fiocco and PhD student Katie Peck. Fiocco will be talking about  “the predictors and prevention of cognitive decline.” Peck, also from Ryerson, will be talking about her research into the effect of music on brain health.

 

     AlexandraPlease join us on Tues, June 16      Katie                North York Central Library                                5120 Yonge St.

              2:00 to 3:00 pm

 

 

 

 

If you can’t make it to the talk, there are lots of other ways to pursue good practices, and to find out more about the brain’s many mysteries.

What are the day-to-day ways I can practice good brain health?

 

Are there organizations that can help me plan care for myself or for someone I love?

We are fortunate in this city to have lots of resources for research and for care of people with aging brains.

On May 22nd, Baycrest Health Sciences in North York announced $100 million in federal and provincial funding for a national brain research hub. Baycrest also has services for "geriatric residential living, healthcare, research, innovation and education, with a special focus on brain health and aging." 

The Alzheimer's Organization of Canada has lots of resources for learning more about brain health and resources for finding help with care and planning. It also funds research. 

The Alzheimer Society of Canada has "been dedicated to providing help for people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias and their caregivers. That help comes in many ways."

The Canadian Home Care Association provides "an array of services for people of all ages, provided in the home and community setting, that encompasses health promotion and teaching, curative intervention, end-of-life care, rehabilitation, support and maintenance, social adaptation and integration and support for the family caregiver." Its membership includes public and private stakeholders.

 

 

 How do I find out more about the human brain and its strange ways?

 



 

 

Homelessness In Canada

March 16, 2015 | Emoke | Comments (14)

Healing homeRecently, I attended a training session on homelessness which opened my eyes to the topic and the actions that we must take as a society to put an end to this unfortunate and inhumane social issue. The speaker was Stephen Gaetz, a Professor at the Faculty of Education at York University and the Director of the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness and the Homeless Hub. He is also the President of Raising the Roof, a leading Canadian charity that focuses on long term solutions to homelessness.


Here are some facts that I learned from his lecture (statistics are rough estimates):

  • Over 235,000 Canadians experience homelessness in a year
  • 35,000 people a night are homeless
  • 47.5% are single adult men (25-55 years old)
  • Living on the streets is unsafe for women as family violence is a major reason women are homeless
  • Youth 16-24 years old make up 20% of the homeless population. The causes are unique and include abuse, low income from minimum wage jobs and lack of affordable housing
  • In Toronto, 18% of homeless are Aboriginal
  • New Canadians are a growing homeless population

Homelessness as a Problem:

  • Society created the homelessness problem
  • High paying jobs are disappearing
  • Incomes have declined at the same time as increasing housing prices
  • There is a focus on tax credits in Canada - instead of spending more directly on childcare for instance
  • Reductions in welfare payments
  • Wages haven't kept up with inflation
  • From 1980s-1990s, the government reduced spending on affordable housing to balance the budget
  • National investment in housing decreased (including rental)
  • Rise in homelessness in 1990s was a result of shifts in government policy

Causes of Homelessness

  • Family conflict, job loss, accidents (disability), mental health and addiction
  • Racism, discrimination and homophobia 
  • Patients that are discharged from hospitals without any support or guidance
  • Less rehabilitation programs

Myth: people choose to be homeless - most leave home (or a desperate situation) not because they want to but due to a violent situation, sexual abuse, etc.

  • When they leave, they lose everything: family, natural supports, friends and guidance from relatives
  • Health worsens- mental health impacted, depression, disease, nutritionally vulnerable
  • Addictions follow to “numb the pain”
  • Sexual exploitation arises especially for women on the streets that need to make some money
  • Gangs and criminal involvement increases - for self-protection and to feed a drug habit
  • Homeless are victims of crime as whatever little they own is stolen on the streets, shelters, etc.
  • 38% of young homeless women were sexually assaulted in the past year

Canadian Response to Homelessness should be:

Prevention
Emergency Response
Housing and Supports

  • We have come to rely on emergency services too much
  • What we really need are prevention and housing supports
  • Alberta - is way ahead of Ontario on homelessness as they have a provincial strategy to end homelessness
  • Medicine Hat has virtually ended homelessness as the city has invested in affordable housing

Ending Homelessness

What is Toronto Public Library Doing:

  • Toronto Public Library has partnered with Toronto Public Health and the City of Toronto’s Streets to Homes to launch a pilot program. The program is currently available two days per week at Toronto Reference Library and Yorkville branch
  • Toronto Public Health nurses help people connect to health resources for mental health and addiction
  • Nurses rove around these branches, checking in with security and librarians about what help is needed

Bookmobile Outreach to Family Shelters

  • Bookmobile outreach and storytimes at Toronto shelters serve women with children
  • Staff register library cards for kids and residents enabling them to borrow books from the bookmobile for extended loan periods
  • Shelter residents don’t get fines and can return books in their shelter

 

The Toronto Reference Library will also have a program in April with Stephen Gaetz as part of their Thought Exchange programming :

 

For more information about this important issue, please see the following books, which can be borrowed from the Toronto Public Library:

Homelessness & Health in Canada  Youth work  Homelessness  Homelessness, housing and the experiences of mental health consumer-survivors

Almost home  Homeless  Children living in transition  Homelessness comes to school

DVDs:

Home safe. Toronto a documentary

Crowe, Cathy, 1952-; MacDonald, Laurel; Sky, Laura; Strong, Phil

Year/Format: 2009, DVD, 1 videodisc (96 min.)

Additional reading:

Youth homelessness in Canada: implications for policy and practice

Housing first in Canada: supporting communities to end homelessness

The State of Homelessness in Canada 2014  (PDF)

Ode to the Illustrious Typewriter

June 23, 2014 | Ann | Comments (8)

See more typewriters by Dr. Shordzi on FlickrContinental Typewriter (image courtesy of Dr. Shordzi on a creative commons licence)

June 23rd is National Typewriter Day.  Those who worked in office settings or used them at home prior to the 1990s will remember these machines well.  Whether they are manual (see above), electric, or electronic, typewriters played a major role in processing information.

The main goal of the typewriter was to enable users to fashion ideas, thoughts, and information into type print.  The process began from the tapping of fingertips on typewriter keys in short staccato strokes. The keys attached in a basket arrangement of thin metal arms (typelevers) that ended in lettered hammers (typebars).  These typebars striked against an inked ribbon to stamp marks onto a sheet of paper clipped to a moving carriage.  Each keystroke spurred the carriage merrily along until a bell chimed to indicate the end of that line.  This "ding" sound informed the typist to push the carriage lever to the right which also propelled the paper up to a new line.  

The process is similar for electric and electronic typewriters.  Electric typewriters requires electricity to operate to reduce finger pressure on the type keys.  Electronic typewriters contain a computerized circuit board to enable the machine to perform added functions such as automatic underline, erase, superscript, subscript, and italic lettering. The most notable improvement on the basic typewriter design for the electric/electronic typewriter was the addition of the "Enter" key that we see on today's computer keyboards.  This new key replaced the manual typewriter carriage and push lever system.  

Here is a video to visualize how the manual typewriter operates:

  

Video courtesy of Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum on a creative commons license.

These machines assisted in the creation of documents, reports, essays, and manuscripts at a quicker pace over handwriting.  Employed typists achieved speeds ranging from 50 to 80 words per minute.  At this pace, it would be difficult to transcribe in longhand while still appearing legible.

Most typewriters shared the same Courier font.  Howard Kettler, as noted in Typedia, developed this font in 1955.  He did not patent his design which was, therefore, quickly shared and adopted by all typewriter makers for its clean and crisp print.

For more information on the history of typewriters, the people who use them, and the cultural influence of these machines, here are some interesting titles to glance over:

The iron whim: a fragmented history of typewriting by Darren S. Wershley-Henry Century of the typewriter by Wilfred Beeching Quirky qwerty by Torbjèorn Lundmark Woman's place is at the typewriter: office work and office workers 1870-1930 by Margery W. Davies
The mindset lists of American history: from typewriters to text messages, what ten generations of Americans think is normal by Tom McBride Gramophone, film, typewriter by Fredrich A. Kittler Smoking typewriters by John Campbell McMillian Technbology, literature and culture by Alex Goody

While electronic typewriters came on the market during the mid-1980s, their popularity quickly evaporated.  Through extensive software development, computers became new and undefeatable rivals. By offering word processing features to enable users to easily type, edit, duplicate and store information in digital form and then transmit this information from one user to another leaving virtually no paper trail, computers pushed aside the typewriters on the market.  Even with this swift change, computers adopted the alphanumeric keyboard from their predecessor.

For more information related to technological and social changes over time, have a look at the following titles:

Technology by Wayne Grady Sex, bombs, and burgers by Peter Nowak The shock of the old: technology and global history since 1900 by David Edgerton From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg: disruptive innovation in the age of the Internet  by John Naughton
100 ideas that changed the world: our most important discoveries, selected by our geatest minds   by Jheni Osman The new media invasion: digital technologies and the world they unmake by  John David Ebert The technological imperative in Canada: an intellectual history by R.D. Francis Writing: theory and history of the technology of civilization by Barry B. Powell

 

Computer Classes, Digital Innovation Hubs, eBooks, eVideos, and eMagazines

The Toronto Public Library offers computers, Internet access and digital services

To keep up with the changing times, the Toronto Public Library offers classes for development of computer and library searching skills.  

Computer Learning CentresThis image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

 

For those who would like to try their skills and learn how to self publish books or create an object on a 3D printer, the Digital Innovation Hubs offer training and hands on experience.

Digital Innovation Hubs

(3D printing at Fort York Branch, photo Toronto Public Library)

 

How about learning how to download an eBook, eAudiobook, eMagazine, eVideo, or look up a business or computer textbook online? Classes are available. 

Ebook training

 

Even with so many technological innovations that have occurred over the past 20 years, the typewriter still bestows an adorable quaintness worth appreciating and celebrating.

Boomers and Beyond: Programs for retirement planning

May 28, 2014 | Ashley | Comments (0)

 
Seniors

Did you know that June is Senior's month? To celebrate the library has a wide assortment of great programs, workshops, computer classes and of course books for Seniors. Now, you may be thinking about retirement even if you aren't a Senior and that is great, the earlier you start planning the better. That is why we invite people of all ages to come to our Senior's month programs, hence our series title "Boomers and Beyond".

The Business Department at North York Central Library has 3 great programs planned for all you boomers, seniors, young people - everyone:

RRSPs: the Ultimate Wealth Builder

GordonpapeFor most Canadians, an RRSP is the only personal pension plan they will ever have. As employer-sponsored plans become increasingly rare outside the public sector, we must rely on our own savings and money management skills to ensure a comfortable lifestyle after retirement. 

Come hear best-selling financial author Gordon Pape provide the secrets to building a winning RRSP - everything from setting up the right kind of plan at the outset, to proven strategies that will enable you to grow your RRSP over time to a value of several hundred thousand dollars.

Tuesday, June 17, 2014. 6:30 - 8:00pm. Auditorium

 

Top 10 Financial Tips for Transitioning into Retirement

Top10

 

Common wisdom says retirees can live on a lot less money than when they were in their working years. But how true is that assumption? In this presentation, Robert Walker will outline the questions retirees (and soon-to-be-retirees) should ask themselves to make sure their retirements are as comfortable as possible without making the money run out.

 Thursday, June 19, 2014. 6:30 - 8:00pm. Auditorium

 

 

Are Pensions a Thing of the Past?

Robertd

 

 

Is there any hope for retirement security for the generations that follow the baby boomers? Come hear University Professor Emeritus, Robert J. Drummond speak about the answer that lies in public pensions (like OAS and CPP) and in measures to improve the productivity and health of the Canadian economy.

 

 Tuesday, June 24, 2014. 6:30 - 8:00pm. Auditorium

 

If you can't make it to the events, maybe you can borrow some of these books on retirement planning:

Retirement1            RRSPs ultimate wealth builder                 Thumb-moolala-rrsp


Other libraries across Toronto are celebrating Senior's month too. There are Internet Safety for Seniors computer classes happening led by library staff to help boomers and seniors be safe online. Topics include being aware of online hoaxes, preventing identity theft and keeping personal information secure when shopping online. Registration may be required, so it is best to contact the branch:

Maria A. Shchuka - Monday, June 16, 2014. 7:00 - 8:30pm. Learning Centre

Agincourt - Wednesday, June 18, 2014. 2:00 - 3:30pm. Learning Centre

Richview - Wednesday, June 25, 2014. 2:00 - 4:00pm. Learning Centre

North York Central Library - Thursday, June 26, 2014. 2pm. Learning Centre

Albert Cambell District Library - Thursday, June 26, 2014. 1:30 - 3:30pm. Learning Centre

Toronto Reference Library - Friday, June 27, 2014. 10am. Learning Centre

 

Seniors
 

 

To kick off Senior's month the,The  Toronto Senior's Forum invites people to celebrate on Tuesday, June 3 from 11:00am - 2:00pm at Toronto City Hall, Nathan Phillips Square.The Toronto Seniors’ Forum is composed of up to 30 people, who are at least 60 years of age and residents of the City of Toronto, with particular attention to seniors whose voices have been less often heard or unheard.

The City of Toronto delivers more than 40 services for seniors,for more information visit www.toronto.ca/seniors 

 

 

 

 

 

 Have a safe and happy Senior's Month everyone!

Book A Librarian

March 21, 2014 | Cathy | Comments (2)

The Book A Librarian service allows patrons to book a 30 to 60 minute appointment with a librarian for assistance with understanding how to do research, get readers' advisory assistance, or learn how to use and access library resources and services.   Appointments can be made in person at the library of your choice or online

Recently, we had an interesting query that resulted in a Book a Librarian appointment in the Science and Technology Department on the 5th floor.  The patron was interested in knowing the types of trees that grew in New York and Massachussetts, and the characteristics of those trees, for example, the height and strength.  After viewing a couple of reference books such as:

 

 
Dirr's Encyclopedia of Trees & Shrubs by Michael Dirr Trees and Shrubs: a gardener's encyclopedia by Geoff Bryant & Tony Rodd  

the patron clarified that he was looking for maps which showed the locations and species of all the trees in New York and Massachussets.  The question appeared to be quite daunting; however, when I demonstrated to the patron how to evaluate information on the Internet, using the CRAAP Test (Currency, Relevance, Authority, Accuracy, Purpose), we discovered a treasure trove of useful sites:

Did you know that NASA, U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Geological Survey created a map documenting the tree population in the U.S.?  The map depicts the measure of organic carbon stored in the trunks, branches and leaves of trees.  The darkest green reveals where there are the densest and tallest forests. This map, created in 2012, will be used to measure future tree loss or gain.

Where the Trees Are

 

"The Forest Inventory and Analysis National Program reports on the status and trends in forest area and location; in the species, size, and health of trees; in total tree growth, mortality, and removals by harvest; in wood production and utilization rates by various products; and in forest land ownership."  Tools are available to create Forest Inventory Maps for individual states. 

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has a website which allows one to search for trees and plants by state.  This one-stop shop provides information on the growth habits of trees, fact sheets on tree species and detailed views of tree locations by state.

Individual states also have associations that track forest inventory.  For example, the New York State Flora Association has created a plant atlas, which provides listings of all the plants growing within any given county.

Showing the patron how to find relevant information online was a great learning experience for me, too; it was amazing to see the amount of current information available from reputable sources--way more detailed than the pages in the oversized atlases of my childhood.   Just a caveat: the purpose of Book of Librarian appointments is to teach how to research information.  For those who are time-strapped and would like a librarian to do the research, IntelliSearch is the library's fee-based custom research service. 

New To Canada? Speak To A COSTI Representative!

March 4, 2014 | Margaret W. | Comments (0)

If you are new to Canada, no doubt you have a lot of questions. Did you know that you can come to North York Central Library and speak to someone who will help you find some answers?

COSTI Immigrant Services is a community-based multicultural agency which has been serving all immigrant communities and new Canadians for many years. At the library sessions, a COSTI representative will answer your questions about:

  • COSTemployment
  • education
  • health
  • housing

and settling into your community.

These are drop-in sessions, so you don't have to register - just come.

The sessions occur on the last Friday of every month, from 1pm - 3pm, in room 2/3 at North York Central Library.

Upcoming dates are:

  • Friday February 28th
  • Friday March 28th
  • Friday April 25th
  • Friday May 30th
  • Friday June 27th

It will definitely be worth your time.

North York Central Library's address is: 5120 Yonge Street Toronto, Ontario M2N 5N9

If you need more information, call the Society and Recreation Department at 416-395-5660.

Happy Financial Literacy Month! Are you a good financial role model?

November 13, 2013 | Ashley | Comments (2)

Finace Role Model

Did you know that November is officially Financial Literacy Month in Canada? You may not know because it is a fairly new initiative, this is Canada's 3rd annual Financial Literacy Month. The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC) and the Financial Literacy Action Group (FLAG) (which is 7 non profit organizations), launched this event for the first time in November 2011.  Unfortunately, there is a need for this, Canada has one of the highest debt to income ratios (MoneySense), we are struggling financially. In November FLAG and FCAC have organized events all across Canada to educate Canadians about their finances. They have created a calendar of events (most of them are free), you should invest your time wisely and check some out!


Buyersremorsebig
 

According to the The Investor Education Fund (IEF) only 3 out of 10 Ontarians are aware of typical priorities and strategies for long-term saving and even fewer know how financial priorities change with age (IEF). The IEF's website getsmarteraboutmoney.ca provides unbiased programs and tools to help consumers make better financial and investing decisions. They delivered a program early this year at North York Central Library, where they shared the 8 universal truths about your money, the number one truth on the list:

1. Know your money personality. 
Everyone has a personality: unique attributes, values, goals, worries, tendencies, likes and dislikes that define their character. These traits also apply to your relationship with money – you have a “money personality.” Knowing your money personality can help you meet your financial goals. For example, if you know that you are a spender, you could make saving a habit by setting up an automatic deposit to your savings account every payday.

They have a lot of other great tools on their website including; a mortgage calculators, a wedding budget spreadsheet, student debt calculators, and a  lot more great resources and tips for people in all financial stages of life.

 

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One of the purposes of this month is to help Canadians invest in their future and the future of their children. The Business Department has planned a program to celebrate Financial Literacy Month this November:

Are You a Good Financial Role Model for your Children?

Please join us at the North York Central Library  for an informative financial literacy session. Learn how to understand the goals and challenges of teaching children about money. This Program is brought to you by Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada. 

This program is being held in the auditorium at North York Central Library on Tuesday, November 19, 2013 from 6:30 - 8:00. You can either call 416-395-5613 to register, or just drop in - we'll let you in! 

Of course, you can always visit the North York Central Library's Business Department on the 4th floor and check out all of our personal finance, investment and economics books, DVDs, databases and newsletters. The staff at the reference desk are always happy to help you!

Here are some books to help you get started on teaching your kids about money:

                               MoneysmartkidsMoney savvy kids

                                Financially intelligent parent        Happy money


Thanks for reading, have a Happy Financial Literacy Month!

 

Mark your calendars. This October is full of awesome programs at North York Central Library!

September 30, 2013 | Ashley | Comments (0)

              

CrowdfundingCraig
Craig Asano from the National Crowdfunding Association of Canada
    
CrowdfundingJames
Filmmaker and Successful Crowdfunding user James Cooper

 

This fall we've already had some great small business programs so far. October is officially Small Business month, but we've already had 3 small business programs here at North York Central Library this past September. The pictures above are from our first program Crowdfunding for Beginners where Craig Asano; Founder and Executive Director of National Crowdfunding Associaion of Canada  (NCFA) and  James Cooper; who used kickstarterforfilmmakers.com to raise over $26,000 for his film Elijah the Prophet, discussed what it takes to prepare and launch a successful crowdfunding campaign.

It's funny, someone was asking me about crowdfunding on the reference desk in the Business Department, they asked why we had a program on it if it isn't actually fully legal in Canada. Well, it actually is, the legislation has changed and there have been many successful crowdfunding stories across Canada. I learned a lot from the program we had with the NCFA, they've provided a lot of good information on their website. I wrote a blog with some crowdfunding examples and resources a couple weeks ago. We are planning to have more programs on Crowdfunding in the very near future, so not to worry if you missed it!

 

Fall for small business
Fall for Small Business display created by one of our Business Librarians

We have 3 more small business programs coming up and one personal finance program this week. 

Here are the small business programs happening at North York Central Library, they will all be held in our auditorium  (2nd floor, west side):

Doing Business with the Government of Canada/Tuesday, October 1, 2013. 6:30 - 8:00pm

The Government of Canada purchases approximately $20 billion worth of goods and services each year. Join us with John Lu from the Office of Small and Medium Enterprises and learn how to sell to the Government of Canada, including how to navigate the federal procurement process, how to market your products and services, where to find opportunities and much more. 

The Mentor's Circle: Clearing Your Path to Business Growth/Tuesday, October 15, 2013. 6:30 - 8:00pm

Join author Elizabeth Verwey as she explores the benefits of peer mentoring. Based on her book, the mentors circle provides a way to solve problems, brainstorm, gain new perspectives and take the necessary steps to grow your business. Learn how to clear your path for business growth.

The New Ecology of Leadership - Why Small is Beautiful/ Thursday, October 17, 2013. 6:30 - 8:00pm

Join author David Hurst as he discusses themes covered in his recently published book The New Ecology of Leadership. Learn how best to utilize your own management experiences and education to improve your judgment and organization. Discover the ways that small is truly beautiful! 

This is the personal finance program happening this week:

Carrick on Money/ Thursday, October 3, 2013. 7:00 - 8:00pm

Rob Carrick, the Globe and Mail's personal finance columnist since 1998, talks about the good, bad and the downright awful in Canadian investments. Opinionated and no-nonsense financial advice that you can use.

All programs are free! Call 416-395-5613 to register. Hope to see you there!

 

 

 

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