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Entrepreneur in Residence: How to Realize Your Dreams?

October 25, 2014 | Charlene | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

Napoleon Hill's book Think and Grow Rich! "sold out it's first print run in three weeks" in the late 1930s. Today, it is considered the greatest self-improvement books of all time." His philosophy of personal achievement has been an inspiration to many, including many successful well-known business leaders today.  

To learn more about his principles and philosophy of success, attend one of our programs at North York Central Library. Hear Sunny Verma and guest speaker Satish Verma discuss Napoleon Hill's secrets of success and examples of some well-know billionaires who put his formula to prosperity into practice. Learn how to create your destiny through entrepreneurship in this mind-opening seminar. No registration is required.  FREE.

When: Tuesday, October 28, 2014: 6:30 p - 8:00 pm - North York Central Library

Discover how you too can create your own brand of success in business and life. Try reading some of the suggested titles below:

The Science of Success The Magic Ladder to Success: The Wealth-Builder's Concise Guide to Winning!  The Wealth Choice: Success Secrets of Black Millionaires Think and Grow Rich for Women 

                                                                                                        

Free Science Events in Toronto for November 2014

October 25, 2014 | Jeannette | Comments (2) Facebook Twitter More...

The Science and Technology Department of North York Central Library compiles a monthly calendar of free science and applied science events in Toronto. Applied science includes health, gardening, pets and food; all subjects found in the department's collection. Here is the November calendar (PDF).

November’s highlights include:

  • November 9: How to Feed 9 Billion in 2050, the speaker will explore the question: is eating plants better for both human and environmental health?
  • November 13: Toronto Diabetes Expo, this event features onstage programming, complemented by an exhibitor area.
  • November 23: EcoFair, a family-oriented event that informs and inspires people to make greener choices in their homes and communities.

The Toronto Public Library also offers many free science and applied science events:

November's highlights include:

Can't attend a program or want to read more about the topics covered? Try some of these titles:

Feeding the planet  Mayo Clinic - The essential diabetes book  All you need is less  Authentic aromatherapy 

Photoshop CS6 essential skills  Breathing room  Arduino for beginners  Makers at work

This post was edited on October 27, 2014

Got the Fever? /ɪˈlɛkʃən/ Fever?

October 20, 2014 | Ann | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

Elections - City of Toronto website
Image courtesy of The City of Toronto website

Defining Election

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the general definition for the word election, (pronounced "ɪˈlɛkʃən") is as follows,

The formal choosing of a person for an office, dignity, or position of any kind; usually by the votes of a constituent body. (retrieved from OED.com on October 5, 2014)

On Monday, October 27, 2014, the polls will open and the people of the City of Toronto will have the opportunity to select a new mayor, a councillor to represent each of the 44 City Wards, and 3 school trustees during this municipal election.   A full list of election candidates is available for your perusal.

The link to where to vote is conveniently located on the ballot box below.

  MyVote link to search for your Ward #, ward map location, voting eligibility, ballot samples used, and voting locations

Image: (License: CC0 Public Domain / FAQ  Free for commercial use / No attribution required)

 

"Election Fever" with Guest Speaker, Edward Keenan

Prior to the official election date, North York Central Library is offering a program on Thursday, October 23, 2014 from 7 pm to 8 pm in the Concourse. 

The program is called, Election Fever: Exploring What Makes Our City Great with guest speaker, Edward Keenan who is currently involved in several notable professions including working as a columnist for The Toronto Star and as a talk show host at Newstalk radio 1010.   Please register by calling (416) 395-5660 to reserve a seat.

 

Edward Keenan programs and booksImage Courtesy of Edward Keenan

 

Edward Keenan is also a writer and author of the recently released (2013) book, Some Great Idea:  Good Neighbourhoods, Crazy Politics and the Invention of Toronto.  The Toronto Public Library offers print and e-book versions for your reading pleasure.  

 

Some Great Idea: Good Neighbourhoods, Crazy Politics and the Invention of Toronto by Edward Keenan

 

Suggested Titles to Feed the Election Fever

Come visit the Society and Recreation Department on the 3rd floor.  We have an excellent display of intriguing titles on social and political science encompassing Canada as well as specific books and magazines on Toronto.

 

Society & Recreation Department Display October 2014

 

As the energy for the upcoming municipal election reaches fever pitch, voters may also want to glance through resources pertaining to elections, votes, and political choices in Canada:

Dynasties and interludes: past and present in Canadian electoral politics by Lawrence LeDuc   Dominance & decline: making sense of recent Canadian elections by Elisabeth Gidengil Voting behaviour in Canada Fights of our lives: elections, leadership and the making of Canada by John Duffy
Parties, elections, and the future of Canadian politics by Amanda Bittner and Royce Koop Steps toward making every vote count: electoral system reform in Canada and its provinces by Henry Milner Making political choices: Canada and the United States by Harold D. Clarke The Canadian election studies: assessing four decades of influence by Antoine Bilodeau, Mebs Kanji, and Thomas J. Scotto

 

Enjoy the program, cultivate your knowledge with the best resources available, and select the most suitable candidates to serve the people of the City.

Empower Your Presence: 5 Tips to Tailor Your Workplace Image

October 1, 2014 | Charlene | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

(Prime Impressions Image Consulting)
 

Possessing an empowered presence can increase your success and true wealth, whether going for an interview, starting out in your career, or vying for a promotion. Dressing intentionally plays a huge a role in impression management. 

Come hear Catherine Bell, President of Prime Impressions Image Consulting give five tips on tailoring your workplace image and how to use them to navigate “The Ladder of Formality” for all sorts of work environments – from professional attire, through three levels of business casual – so that you’ll always stride forth with confidence and ease.  Please join us on Tuesday, October 7, 2014, 6:30-8:00 pm at North York Central Library - Auditorium.  Please register online.

To learn more about improving your workplace image, Toronto Public Library offers material in various formats for your convenience.

 

Sustaining Hope Through Architectural Innovation

September 26, 2014 | Maureen | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

How many times have you noticed paper tossed into a garbage bin, even though there is a clearly marked recycling bin right beside it? Maybe your answer is the same as mine – which is, too many times to count. The distance from one bin to the other is less than the distance a person’s arm travels between a potato chip bag and their mouth. The tiny legs of an ant can travel it in a couple of seconds. If the slight arm movement needed to cover a few centimeters is too much effort to make for the sake of the environment, how realistic is it to hope we'll make the bigger changes needed to ensure a healthy planet? Thinking about those few centimeters can be unhealthy for my sense of hope.

It's hard to be optimistic about theSept 22 2014 health of the environment these days, but there are reasons for hope. The hundreds of thousands of people all over the world who participated in The People's Climate March on September 21 made me forget about the indifference I see in those few centimeters between the bins. Another hopeful sign is innovation in the field of sustainable architecture. On Wednesday, October 15 Terri Meyer Boake, a professor at University of Waterloo's School of Architecture, will give a presentation on sustainable architecture and design at North York Central Library. Professor Meyer Boake will illustrate the talk with many images. It's sure to be an interesting and hope inspiring night. The talk begins at 7:00 p.m. Please call 416-395-5639 to register for this free program.                            

Marchers filled the streets of New York. Creative Commons: Greg McNevin, 2014 - See more at: http://tcktcktck.org/2014/09/hundreds-thousands-take-streets-climate-action/64529#sthash.oIxqehw2.dpuf

If you have an interest in sustainable architecture, you may be interested in one of these items, available at the Toronto Public Library:

Marchers filled the streets of New York. Creative Commons: Greg McNevin, 2014 - See more at: http://tcktcktck.org/2014/09/hundreds-thousands-take-streets-climate-action/64529#sthash.oIxqehw2.dpuf
Marchers filled the streets of New York. Creative Commons: Greg McNevin, 2014 - See more at: http://tcktcktck.org/2014/09/hundreds-thousands-take-streets-climate-action/64529#sthash.oIxqehw2.dpuf
Tiny, a story about living small Inovative Houses, Concepts for Sustainable Living 150 best sustainable home ideas
Sustainable design, a critical guide Prefabulous homes, energy efficient and sustainable homes around the globe Inspired homes, architecture for changing times

Photo of People's Climate Change March in New York City used with permission by Avaaz.org

Free Science Events in Toronto for October 2014

September 25, 2014 | Jeannette | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

The Science and Technology Department of North York Central Library compiles a monthly calendar of free science and applied science events in Toronto. Applied science includes health, gardening, pets and food; all subjects found in the department's collection. Here is the October calendar (PDF).

October's highlights include:

The Toronto Public Library also offers many free science and applied science events:

October's highlights include:

 

Everything you wanted to know about statistics...but were afraid to ask

September 16, 2014 | Cathy | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

Numbers

Image courtesy of www.research-live.com

 

"Statistics is the grammar of science." Karl Pearson

Statistics is important in understanding and interpreting science especially with respect to research...but everyone can enjoy a basic understanding of statistics for their everyday life. For example, when I took my first statistics course, we were asked to calculate the odds of winning the 6/49 lottery. I knew the odds were not good, but I was shocked to learn the chances of winning was just 1 in 14 million (actually, over 14 million). I remember those odds everytime I feel like buying a ton of lottery tickets so that I can quit my job. 

There are a couple of fun ways to learn more about statistics:

  • Come out to Dr Eric Mintz's presentation, "Everything you wanted to know about statistics...but were afraid to ask" at North York Central Library on Wednesday, September 24 at 7 pm. Don't worry, this won't be a snoozefest--Dr. Mintz aims to make it fun, entertaining and informative!

More traditional ways to learn about statistics:

  Correlated
The Tao of statistics: a path to understanding (with no math) by Dana K. Keller Correlated: from square dancing and bumper stickers to Trekkies and ketchup, surprising connections between seemingly unrelated things by Shaun Gallagher Risk savvy: how to make good decisions by Gerd Gigerenzer
Understanding uncertainty by D.V. Lindley The improbability principle: why coincidences, miracles and rare events happen everyday by D.J. Hand The cartoon introduction to statistics by Grady Klein

 

Toronto Poetry Slam Team performance: not your grandma's poetry!

September 12, 2014 | Maureen | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

In the beginning was the word…”

Then came poets and storytellers, doing spoken word performance, painting with words inside people’s minds. If you love the beauty, the power, the magic and the music of words, come to North York Central Library on Friday September 26, where a feast is being prepared for lovers of the spoken word. The Toronto Poetry Slam Team, a group of spoken word poets who have performed across North America, will take to the stage in the North York Central Library auditorium at 7:00 p.m. to perform their original work. And I do mean perform. This is NOT a poetry reading. These spoken word artists don’t recite their poetry, they perform it -- energetically, emotionally and passionately.

Be advised: as it says on the Toronto Poetry Slam website, "this ain’t your grandma's poetry!" It can hit hard, be provocative, political, raw. Please call 416 395 5639 to register for this free Culture Days program. There are more than 40 free Culture Days programs offered at library branches across the city. This Canada wide celebration of arts and culture takes place on Friday September 26 and Saturday September 27.

Would you like to learn more about poetry slams? Reserve one of these items and have it sent to a library near you!

Stage a poetry slam Take the mic The complete idiot's guide to slam poetry
The spoken word revolution The spoken word revolution redux Louder than a bomb
This anthology includes a CD with over 70 minutes of electrifying live poetry in a wide variety of styles. Includes a CD with over 75 minutes of slam poetry, dub poetry, hip-hop poetica and more. This video follows four Chicago-area high school poetry teams as they prepare for and compete in the world's largest youth slam.


Video used by permission of the Toronto Poetry Project

Science Literacy

September 5, 2014 | Jeannette | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

September 22-29 is Science Literacy Week. The Toronto Public Library will be joining the University of Toronto’s Gerstein Library to highlight and promote science and science literacy through displays and programs.

Last week, the CBC reported that Canadians' science literacy was ranked highest in the world. According to the National Science Education Standards, scientific literacy means a person has the ability to:

  • Ask, find, or determine answers to questions derived from curiosity about everyday experiences
  • Describe, explain and predict natural phenomena
  • Read with understanding articles about science in the popular press and to engage in social conversation about the validity of the conclusions
  • Identify scientific issues underlying national and local decisions
  • Evaluate the quality of scientific information on the basis of its source and the methods used to generate it
  • Pose and evaluate arguments based on evidence

The Science & Technology department, in particular the Science Fair collection, at the North York Central Library, contain books that can help understand and improve science literacy:

The art of science  Everyday practice of science  The language of science  Reading and understanding research

Science matters   What counts as credible evidence in applied research and evaluation practice  What the numbers say  Why science 

Want something to read right now? Access and download these popular science magazines through our Zinio database:

Astronomy   Discover   Earth  Popular science

Also, access our Science in Context database for journal articles, news, videos, images and audio on major science topics:

Science in Context

Science Literacy Week is a good opportunity to brush up on your science knowledge or learn something new through the library’s programs, books and displays.

 

Picture Labour Day...Over A Century Ago

August 29, 2014 | Ann | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

  More Labour Day images from The Toronto Public Library Pinterest website

Labour Day in Toronto along Queen Street West near Claremont Avenue in 1905 (Photo courtesy of The Toronto Public Library)

Hours of Operation

Welcome to the first day of September which happens to fall on the first Monday of the month.  As this day marks the Labour Day statutory holiday, all public libraries, post offices, government buildings, and private businesses are closed for the day. The library will re-open for regular hours on Tuesday.  Sunday hours will resume for District branches and Research and Reference libraries including North York Central Library and the Toronto Reference Library.  Sunday, September 7, 2014 is the first Sunday the library will open in the Fall at 1:30 pm and close at 5:00 pm.

 

Picture Labour Day in 1905 (close-up view)

Going back one hundred and nine years ago, visualize standing on a raised wooden platform from the main street and looking up at the cool misty grey sky. A photographer gages the weather and scans the procession.  Beside him, balanced on a tall wrought iron tripod, rests an early-period camera.  He peers through the camera lens and squeezes a rubber bulb connected to the camera.   A crisp image materializes showing marchers moving westward along Queen Street West with crowds gathering on sidewalks across the north and south sides of the street.

A conductor leads the parade and he exhibits stern confidence.  Behind him, the musicians keep pace while performing on their trombones, tubas, trumpets, and drums.  The band appears loosely dispersed along the street to ensure enough space to safely perform, march, and read their sheet music.

Drawn forward by the rousing tunes from the band, hundreds of men marching are decked out in suits, peaked caps, and what appears to be long cloth pendants pinned and draping from the marchers' left breast pockets.  These uniformed men line and fill several street blocks.  

The women in the crowd wear long flowing dresses with big fancy bonnets worn over their hair.  The girls are adorned in knee-high dresses with their pretty hair beribboned and braided in flattering bows.  The men observing the parade appear immaculate in their dress suits and assorted hats--consisting of bowlers, panamas, and fedoras.  Some men are seen whispering quietly amongst themselves. On the upper right-hand side in the photograph, the crowd gathers under opened umbrellas and store awnings to avoid the drizzling rain.  Behind the wooden post on Claremont Avenue, a man sits in his horse-drawn carriage watching the parade go by.

 

Queen Street West and Claremont Avenue a Century Later (Google Maps Image)

The current image of Queen Street West and Claremont Avenue shows some structural changes since 1905.  For instance, the building that housed the Bunker Brothers Carriage and Wagon Works on the northwest side of Claremont Avenue in 1905 no longer exists.  In its place currently stands a Starbuck's coffee shop.  On the northeast side stood the Cairo Bros. store in 1905.  Today, the Sanko Trading Co., which sells Japanese food and various types of artifacts, maintains the original building in fine condition.  

 

Celebrate Labour Day (Google Images of Past Parades)

Fair pay, safe working conditions, fair rights for all workers, and the ability for employees to voice their concerns continue to be important issues for workers' unions to address, negotiate, and achieve with employers.  For more information on the history of Labour Day in Canada, please have a look at the website, Canada's History - The First Labour Day.

In March 2012, The Toronto Public Library defended against budget cuts and library closures as discussed in Maureen O'Reilly's March 14, 2014 Toronto Star article, When will the city learn to love its librarians?  The library continues to provide programs, print and online resources, and an environment for the public to learn, relax, and connect.  

Listed below are some worthy titles pertaining to labour, work, and industry:

The workers' festival - a history of Labour Day in Canada by Craig Heron A good day's work - in pursuit of a disappearing Canada by John DeMont All labor has dignity by Martin Luther King, Jr. Work, industry, and Canadian society by H. Krahn
Social work under pressure - how to overcome stress, fatigue and burnout in the workplace by Kate Van Heugten Working without committments - the health effects of precarious employment by Wayne Lewchuk Work - a very short introduction by Stephen Fineman The quality of work - a people-centered agenda by Graham S. Lowe


Every year on Labour Day Monday, the marchers gather between University Avenue and Dundas Street West in the morning.  By 1:30 pm the parade proceeds south to Queen Street West and then westbound towards Dufferin Street and finally southbound through the Dufferin Gates into the CNE.  Come see and support us on our march along the way!

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