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Free Science Events in Toronto for February 2016

February 2, 2016 | Jeannette | Comments (0)

The Science and Technology Department of North York Central Library compiles a monthly calendar of free science and applied science events in Toronto. Applied science includes health, gardening, pets and food; all subjects found in the department's collection. Here is the February calendar (PDF).

February's highlights include:

Toronto Public Library also offers many free science and applied science events:

At the library, February's highlights include:

Can't attend a program or want to read more about the topics covered? Try some of these books:

Respiratory   Spider silk   Ice carving 101   Spark

Good germs, bad germs   Winter blues   Cut your energy bills now   Teach yourself visually Excel 2013

 

Exercise Your Talents in New & Exciting Ways

January 4, 2016 | Ann | Comments (2)

Exercise titles available at North York Central Library
The above image is licensed by nyphotographic.com under a Creative Commons license which permits the free use of the image.

The holiday season for 2015 has drawn to a close. Consider the next signpost to appear over the horizon on the proverbial road through life that reads, "Exercise." This is a daunting suggestion right after a delirious period of holiday binging and relaxing. 

The interesting aspect of this word is its dual nature--it can either describe a "thing" or an "action." An exercise, for instance, conveys a static description of tasks to be completed whereas the phrase to exercise reflects a dynamic expression of movement.

When the static state awakens into dynamic motion, this is what Robert Pirsig, an American writer and philosopher, defines as the concept of Quality (or the Metaphysics of Quality (MOQ) in his later works). Much like a resting muscle fiber anticipates a jolt of electricity to leap into action, this qualitative point represents a brief opportunity to leap into new terrains of thought and creativity. The concepts of past and future are stored as static memories and planned goals, respectively. The present moment is a small window in time to act, create, and live in full alertness.

Pirsig contrasts this dynamic state with its opposite--a busy mind occupied with regrets over past actions or anxiety over future situations yet to unfold. In other words, the mind is not focused on the present moment:

“We’re in such a hurry most of the time we never get much chance to talk. The result is a kind of endless day-to-day shallowness, a monotony that leaves a person wondering years later where all the time went and sorry that it’s all gone.”

“In a car you're always in a compartment, and because you're used to it you don't realize that through that car window everything you see is just more TV. You're a passive observer and it is all moving by you boringly in a frame. On a cycle the frame is gone. You're completely in contact with it all. You're in the scene, not just watching it anymore, and the sense of presence is overwhelming.”

Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Also take a moment to listen to a special (1974) interview by Connie Goldman with Robert Pirsig on CBC.  

The best way to appreciate this philosophical concept on Quality is to crack open his book, The Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance and escape with him and his young son on a journey through the world of metaphysics. 

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

Here are more life-affirming titles on philosophy for exercising the awakening mind:

Use philosophy to be happier: 30 steps to perfect the art of living Heads up philosophy The weight of things: philosophy and the good life The consolation of philosophy
  Philosophy: all that matters The best things in life: a guide to what really matters The cartoon introduction to philosophy, 1st ed. Stoicism and the art of happiness

For some readers who prefer a quick "pick me up" on self-motivation instead of longer detailed discussions on philosophical concepts, the psychology section offer suggestions on how to view the world in a fun and positive light:

Positive psychology for overcoming depression: self-help strategies for happiness, inner strength and well-being    One simple idea: how positive thinking reshaped modern life The positive dog: a fable about changing your attitude to be your best Kiss that frog: 12 great ways to turn negatives into positives in your life and work
A life worth living: contributions to positive psychology   Lift: becoming a positive force in any situation Pursuing the good life: 100 reflections on positive psychology Hardwiring happiness: the new brain science of contentment, calm, and confidence

Once the mind is awakened to think beyond the mental sludge of everyday schedules, projects, and routines, consider expending this energy in new inspirational ways. The authors listed below have documented their own adventures in the world:

Long way down Climbing the seven summits: a comprehensive guide to the continents' highest peaks Golf freek: one man's quest to play as may rounds of golf as possible for free The adventures of Henry Thoreau: a young man's unlikely path to Walden Pond
Backpacking with the saints: wilderness hiking as spiritual practice Zen and the way of the sword: arming the samurai psyche Solo, yet never alone: swimming the Great Lakes What I talk about when I talk about running - a memoir

If you are ready to delve into a new terrain, learn the latest skills to be competitive in today's job force, or improve your current skills but do not know where to start, the Toronto Public Library website offers a superb selection of databases with a wealth of information. Some useful topics include: 

Ancestry Library Edition
Ancestry
Business Writing
Business Writing
Career Cruising
Career Cruising
Chilton's Auto Repair
Chilton's Auto Repair
Learning Express Library
Learning Express
Lynda.com
Lynda.com
Mango Languages
Mango Languages
Study Skills Success
Study Skills Success

Ancestry (In-Library use only) is a popular genealogy resource that includes U.S., Canadian, European, Australian, and New Zealand records. Specific topics include census, birth, marriage, death, immigration, military records and more. Ancestry offers a great opportunity to access records essential to building your family tree.

Business Writing offers an opportunity to sharpen your writing skills in various forms of business correspondence such as writing letters, reports, and emails. This resource would benefit those who plan to work in a business environment and need to communicate effectively to clients and staff.

Career Cruising enables you to preview a career and see whether this profession suits your personality. The career guidance resource offers career profiles and links to relevant Canadian college and university programs and also includes a Canadian Job Search section.

Chilton's Auto Repair is a useful database for looking up repair manuals, maintenance schedules, service bulletins and Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) test prep quizzes. If Robert Pirsig could repair his own motorcycle with Zen-like grace, imagine an increase in self-confidence while changing the oil or replacing the brake pads on your vehicle. 

Learning Express Library offers practice tests and answers for all ages. LSAT, MCAT, GMAT, SAT, GED, Canadian citizenship practice test, TOEIC, TOEFL iBT, math, grammar, writing and more are available here. This is a chance to practice writing the entry tests and determine how prepared you are before applying. For those who just enjoy testing their many skills, this would be a good resource to use.

Lynda.com is a new database that offers over 3,500 video tutorial courses led by experts on web design, software development, photography, business skills, home and small office, project management, 3D + Animation, graphic design audio, music, video editing and more. This resource requires the creation of a personal account which will allow you to track your progress through your tutorials and offers certificates of program completion that you could proudly post on your LinkedIn account.

Mango Languages offers an opportunity to practice and converse in new languages or to improve your spoken English. The online "cue cards" provide audio and visual interaction with the interface to develop these skills effectively. If you want to feel more confident conversing with people in a different country, this resource will help you on your way.

Study Skills Success offers high school and college student skills on how to do research, write term papers and essays. This database also offers practice tests with answers.  If your aim is to improve your studying skills, then this resource will nicely dovetail with your goal.

Enjoy the New Year by living every single second in the present. Inspire yourself to exercise your talents in new and exciting ways each and every moment in life.

Computing Mutations

December 1, 2015 | Jane | Comments (0)

The Human Genome Project finished mapping the three billion-or-so chemical base pairs that make the how-to-build-a-human instructions code in 2003. It was a monumental step. But of course each human’s code is unique, and the difficulty of “reading” the genomic map means that in some sense this was just the beginning.

Fast forward to 2015, and to Brendan Frey of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research at the University of Toronto. Frey has devised a method of identifying diseases such as cancer and neurological disorders such as autism by applying a computational approach. He and his research team use a computer tool that "scores how strongly genetic variants affect RNA splicing, a critical step in gene expression.” This technique requires an understanding of the biological processes involved with gene replication, but uses computer science to arrive at very accurate readings of the genome “book.” It is an exciting development that should revolutionize medicine.

  1254806SummaryFigure

Among his many apparent gifts - Frey has appointments in the departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the Banting and Best Department of Medical Research, and the Department of Computer Science at the University of Toronto. He is good at explaining things in ways the rest of us can understand. We hope you can come to hear him talk about his groundbreaking work.

How We Discovered a Hidden Genetic Code

Tues. Dec. 8, 2015

7:00-8:00 pm

Auditorium

North York Central Library

5120 Yonge Street

Toronto M2N 5N9

*****

Science and Technology Dept.

416-395-5649

 

And if you can’t make his talk (or even if you can), check out some of these books on the impact of genetics and genomics.

 Bioinformatics and Computational Biology  Deeper Genome Emerging Trends in Computational Biology  Geneticinfluencesonaddictionjpg  Genomicmessages  Inheritance 


Statistical methods for qtl Geneticgeographies  Handbook genetics and society   Introductiontogenomics

 

iPad/iPhone Tips

April 17, 2015 | Jeannette | Comments (0)

Recently, I was helping a patron download movies from hoopla on to her iPad. While I was helping her, I showed her how to delete an app she no longer wanted by pressing and holding on the app and then pressing the x at the top left corner of it. She wasn’t aware of this. I proceeded to show her a couple more tips, like the ones below (the following tips work in iOS 8; they may or may not work in the older iOS):
 

Forcing an app to close

What do you do when an app isn't working or responding? You can force the app to close and then re-open it. Hopefully, this will resolve the issue. To force an app to close, press the home button twice. You'll see previews of your recently used apps. Find the app you want to close and swipe the app up.

Force close apps          Force close apps 2
 

Keyboards

Did you know you can type in different languages? I recently helped my mom add a Chinese keyboard to her iPad. Here’s how to add a keyboard: Settings > General > Keyboards > Keyboards > Add New Keyboard…

Keyboard          Korean keyboard

Once a keyboard is added, access it by pressing the globe button to the left of the space bar. If you have multiple keyboards, you can keep pressing the globe button until it toggles to the desired keyboard.
 

Internet address domain shortcut

Did you know when you are typing a web address in the address bar there is a shortcut to writing .com, .ca, .org, etc.? To access the shortcut, press and hold the period. Several domain extensions will appear. Select the one you need.

Internet domain shortcut
 

What song is that?

Sometimes a song will come on the radio in the car and I’m dying to find out what song it is. What do I do? There are apps available to help figure this out. Or you can just ask Siri. Siri works as a personal assistant and knowledge navigator. The feature uses natural language user interface to answer questions, make recommendations and perform actions.

To find out the song, first hold down the home button which will activate Siri. Ask Siri “What song is this?”. Then Siri will listen to the song. If Siri is able to decipher the song, it will let you know.

Siri song          Siri song result

Sometimes, Siri is disabled on the phone. To enable Siri: Settings > General > Siri. If Siri is enabled, a green button will appear next to it. To disable it, simply slide the button over to switch it off.

Siri on
 

There are also lots of things you can do on your device with your Toronto Public Library card.

You can download e-books, e-audiobooks, e-magazines, movies, television shows and full music albums. For help accessing these services, visit the websites below:

  • hoopla: movies, television shows and full music albums

The North York Central Library also offers free E-Book Drop In sessions every Saturday from 2-3 pm in the Atrium (call 416-395-5672 for more information). Bring your device and questions and we’ll be happy to help you access these awesome services one step at a time.

To learn more about iPads and iPhones, here are some books from the library:

iPad for the older and wiser   My iPad mini  Teach yourself visually iPad  The ultimate iPad

iPhone for dummies  iPhone secrets   iPhone with iOS 8 for seniors  The unauthorized guide to iPhone, iPad and iPod repair

You can access these books online:

iPad all in one for dummies  iPad the missing manual  iPhone all in one for dummies  iPhone for seniors for dummies

Do you know any useful tips for the iPad or iPhone? If you do, please share them below in the comments. Did you find this post useful? If you did, please let me know and I can share some more tips in the future. Thanks!

 

A Modern Plague

April 2, 2015 | Carolyn | Comments (0)

In Romeo and Juliet, Mercutio curses the feuding families by wishing "A plague on both your houses". I find it interesting that in Shakespeare's time a plague - a disease - was considered one of the worst curses one could wish on an enemy.

Burying Plague Victims of TournaiBurying Plague Victims of Tournai. Public doman image.

What was once known as a plague we now call a pandemic - a widespread outbreak of a communicable disease, sometimes with a significant mortality rate.

Fear of pandemics is understandable

The Black Death (bubonic plague) killed over 50 million people in Asia and Europe between 1339-51, and the single worst pandemic in recorded history, the Spanish flu, killed about the same number of people in a single year (1918-19). Other pandemics, while not as deadly, have also had devastating consequences.

But is it rational?

On the one hand, we have more information about prevention, causes and treatments for communicable diseases than ever before. It's easier for public health officials to communicate alerts and warnings. On the other hand, increased international travel has meant that disease can spread more quickly than previously around the globe.

Learn more

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 10,000 people died during the recent Ebola outbreak. The speed with which the virus spread, the lack of effective treatments and the high mortality rate caused concern and fear around the world. There were similar concerns during the SARS outbreak in 2003 and over the possible reappearance of avian or bird flu.

Preparing to enter Ebola treatment unitPreparing to enter Ebola treatment unit 
[CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Graduate students from the University of Toronto's Department of Immunology want to clear up some of our misconceptions about Ebola. On Tuesday April 14 they will be giving a talk at the North York Central Library about how viruses infect humans. Focusing on the Ebola virus, they will discuss the biological and sociological factors behind the recent outbreak and explain why the virus spread more in some regions than in others. 

What:   What's in an Outbreak?: an overview of Ebola and infectious disease

Where: North York Central Library

When:  Tuesday April 14, 7:00 pm

To learn more about Ebola and other infectious diseases, check out these websites:

 Books and DVDs about infectious diseases are available at library branches:

 

Plague has long been the subject of novels and films:

Digital Innovation Hub Librarian Internship Experience!

February 2, 2015 | Emoke | Comments (7)

Emoke at Digital Innovation Hub
Photo of me at the Toronto Reference Library Hub

Recently I finished a librarian internship at the Digital Innovation Hub at the Toronto Reference Library. I had the honour of spending about five months there, getting to know what goes on in the hub and learning how to do my own 3D printing along with figuring out the other software that customers use there, such as Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, and MakerWare, to name a few!

The Digital Design Technician staff and others who work at the hub are knowlegeable  about 3D Design, 3D printing, website design, Adobe software and the Asquith Press self publishing book machine services. I learned a lot from them by shadowing their public Digital Design Classes and generally running around the hub watching and listening to how they are helping customers and asking them a million questions along the way. 

This internship changed librarian work for me forever! For a few months, I was not answering reference questions or taking care of a collection of books, but instead; helping architects, engineers, students, inventors, designers, artists, and the general hobbyist or maker with their 3D printing and creative work. I was teaching 3D Printer Certification classes, helping out at the International Book Fair, Maker Faire, and a Hackathon event with the Ryerson Digital Media Zone and Penguin Books. I also helped anyone that walked by learn about the space and gave various group tours.

My time there was a wake-up call about the future direction libraries are heading in. Many customers asked me why the library of all places would have a Makerspace or tech lab. I always tried to answer as eloquently as possible, but really, the answer is pretty simple: the library world has to keep up with innovation, especially technological innovation and offer it in an accessible, helpful and educational way to the public, just like they have always done with computers, programs, and services. 

I was always quite proud of how impressed the public was that the library has a space for 3D printing, designing and printing your own books, and a whole slew of other nerdy techy equipment to help you with your work or play.

Enough said. Go see for yourself how awesome and techy the library has become!

The Innovation Hubs blog

Toronto Reference Library Digital Innovation hub

Fort York Library Digital Innovation hub

MakerBot Replicator 2

 3D Printer, MakerBot Replicator 2 in action!

3D Printing at the Library

 2 Makerbots at the Toronto Reference Library Digital Innovation Hub.

  3D Selfie
 
  3D Selfie, using the XBOX Kinect scanner and software

Side View

 Side view, 3D selfie!

 

Please browse through some books and ebooks the library has to offer about libraries and technological innovation, and digital innovation in general!

The Embedded Librarian  Jump-Start Your Career as a Digital Librarian  Transformed Library

3D Printing  Make: 3D Printing  3D Printing for Dummies

3D Printing with Autodesk  3D Printing  Make: The Makerspace Workbench

Design & Modeling for 3D Printing  Makerspaces

illustrator Foundations  

ebook

Carrot City: urban agriculture in Toronto

September 20, 2014 | Cathy | Comments (4)

Carrot Cityimage courtesy of www.petite-riviere.com

Some people, like my colleague, Carolyn, have very successful home gardens.  I drooled over the pictures of her garlic.  Me?  Not so lucky.  When I talked my husband into buying a house instead of a condo, it was supposedly so the kids would have a backyard to play in.  But really, it was so that I could have a vegetable garden.  After 7 years of trying, I concede defeat to the rabbits, raccoons and all the other neighbourhood critters I have been feeding.  The buffet is now closed. 

I actually had better luck when I had a container garden on a roof in downtown Toronto.  My best success happened when my husband and I sat on the roof spitting watermelon seeds into the containers and many of the seeds sprouted.  I could've had a bajillion watermelons! 

Rooftop gardens are only one of the alternatives to traditional vegetable gardens.  Carrot City is a Ryerson University research initiative that looks at how design can enable the production of food in a city.  On October 1, Ryerson University professors June Komisar, Joe Nasr and Mark Gorgolewski will discuss urban agriculture in Toronto at North York Central Library.

The library carries the professors' book, Carrot City: creating places for urban agriculture, along with many other titles on urban agriculture:

Carrot City: creating places for urban agriculture by Mark Gorgolewski, June Komisar and Joe Nasr The essential urban farmer by Novella Carpenter and Willow Rosenthal Digging the city: an urban agriculture manifesto by Rhona McAdam
City farmer: adventures in urban food growing by Lorraine Johnson The urban food revolution: changing the way we feed cities by Peter Ladner Eat up: the inside scoop on rooftop agriculture by Lauren Mandel

Ode to the Illustrious Typewriter

June 23, 2014 | Ann | Comments (8)

See more typewriters by Dr. Shordzi on FlickrContinental Typewriter (image courtesy of Dr. Shordzi on a creative commons licence)

June 23rd is National Typewriter Day.  Those who worked in office settings or used them at home prior to the 1990s will remember these machines well.  Whether they are manual (see above), electric, or electronic, typewriters played a major role in processing information.

The main goal of the typewriter was to enable users to fashion ideas, thoughts, and information into type print.  The process began from the tapping of fingertips on typewriter keys in short staccato strokes. The keys attached in a basket arrangement of thin metal arms (typelevers) that ended in lettered hammers (typebars).  These typebars striked against an inked ribbon to stamp marks onto a sheet of paper clipped to a moving carriage.  Each keystroke spurred the carriage merrily along until a bell chimed to indicate the end of that line.  This "ding" sound informed the typist to push the carriage lever to the right which also propelled the paper up to a new line.  

The process is similar for electric and electronic typewriters.  Electric typewriters requires electricity to operate to reduce finger pressure on the type keys.  Electronic typewriters contain a computerized circuit board to enable the machine to perform added functions such as automatic underline, erase, superscript, subscript, and italic lettering. The most notable improvement on the basic typewriter design for the electric/electronic typewriter was the addition of the "Enter" key that we see on today's computer keyboards.  This new key replaced the manual typewriter carriage and push lever system.  

Here is a video to visualize how the manual typewriter operates:

  

Video courtesy of Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum on a creative commons license.

These machines assisted in the creation of documents, reports, essays, and manuscripts at a quicker pace over handwriting.  Employed typists achieved speeds ranging from 50 to 80 words per minute.  At this pace, it would be difficult to transcribe in longhand while still appearing legible.

Most typewriters shared the same Courier font.  Howard Kettler, as noted in Typedia, developed this font in 1955.  He did not patent his design which was, therefore, quickly shared and adopted by all typewriter makers for its clean and crisp print.

For more information on the history of typewriters, the people who use them, and the cultural influence of these machines, here are some interesting titles to glance over:

The iron whim: a fragmented history of typewriting by Darren S. Wershley-Henry Century of the typewriter by Wilfred Beeching Quirky qwerty by Torbjèorn Lundmark Woman's place is at the typewriter: office work and office workers 1870-1930 by Margery W. Davies
The mindset lists of American history: from typewriters to text messages, what ten generations of Americans think is normal by Tom McBride Gramophone, film, typewriter by Fredrich A. Kittler Smoking typewriters by John Campbell McMillian Technbology, literature and culture by Alex Goody

While electronic typewriters came on the market during the mid-1980s, their popularity quickly evaporated.  Through extensive software development, computers became new and undefeatable rivals. By offering word processing features to enable users to easily type, edit, duplicate and store information in digital form and then transmit this information from one user to another leaving virtually no paper trail, computers pushed aside the typewriters on the market.  Even with this swift change, computers adopted the alphanumeric keyboard from their predecessor.

For more information related to technological and social changes over time, have a look at the following titles:

Technology by Wayne Grady Sex, bombs, and burgers by Peter Nowak The shock of the old: technology and global history since 1900 by David Edgerton From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg: disruptive innovation in the age of the Internet  by John Naughton
100 ideas that changed the world: our most important discoveries, selected by our geatest minds   by Jheni Osman The new media invasion: digital technologies and the world they unmake by  John David Ebert The technological imperative in Canada: an intellectual history by R.D. Francis Writing: theory and history of the technology of civilization by Barry B. Powell

 

Computer Classes, Digital Innovation Hubs, eBooks, eVideos, and eMagazines

The Toronto Public Library offers computers, Internet access and digital services

To keep up with the changing times, the Toronto Public Library offers classes for development of computer and library searching skills.  

Computer Learning CentresThis image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

 

For those who would like to try their skills and learn how to self publish books or create an object on a 3D printer, the Digital Innovation Hubs offer training and hands on experience.

Digital Innovation Hubs

(3D printing at Fort York Branch, photo Toronto Public Library)

 

How about learning how to download an eBook, eAudiobook, eMagazine, eVideo, or look up a business or computer textbook online? Classes are available. 

Ebook training

 

Even with so many technological innovations that have occurred over the past 20 years, the typewriter still bestows an adorable quaintness worth appreciating and celebrating.

Boomers and Beyond: Programs for retirement planning

May 28, 2014 | Ashley | Comments (0)

 
Seniors

Did you know that June is Senior's month? To celebrate the library has a wide assortment of great programs, workshops, computer classes and of course books for Seniors. Now, you may be thinking about retirement even if you aren't a Senior and that is great, the earlier you start planning the better. That is why we invite people of all ages to come to our Senior's month programs, hence our series title "Boomers and Beyond".

The Business Department at North York Central Library has 3 great programs planned for all you boomers, seniors, young people - everyone:

RRSPs: the Ultimate Wealth Builder

GordonpapeFor most Canadians, an RRSP is the only personal pension plan they will ever have. As employer-sponsored plans become increasingly rare outside the public sector, we must rely on our own savings and money management skills to ensure a comfortable lifestyle after retirement. 

Come hear best-selling financial author Gordon Pape provide the secrets to building a winning RRSP - everything from setting up the right kind of plan at the outset, to proven strategies that will enable you to grow your RRSP over time to a value of several hundred thousand dollars.

Tuesday, June 17, 2014. 6:30 - 8:00pm. Auditorium

 

Top 10 Financial Tips for Transitioning into Retirement

Top10

 

Common wisdom says retirees can live on a lot less money than when they were in their working years. But how true is that assumption? In this presentation, Robert Walker will outline the questions retirees (and soon-to-be-retirees) should ask themselves to make sure their retirements are as comfortable as possible without making the money run out.

 Thursday, June 19, 2014. 6:30 - 8:00pm. Auditorium

 

 

Are Pensions a Thing of the Past?

Robertd

 

 

Is there any hope for retirement security for the generations that follow the baby boomers? Come hear University Professor Emeritus, Robert J. Drummond speak about the answer that lies in public pensions (like OAS and CPP) and in measures to improve the productivity and health of the Canadian economy.

 

 Tuesday, June 24, 2014. 6:30 - 8:00pm. Auditorium

 

If you can't make it to the events, maybe you can borrow some of these books on retirement planning:

Retirement1            RRSPs ultimate wealth builder                 Thumb-moolala-rrsp


Other libraries across Toronto are celebrating Senior's month too. There are Internet Safety for Seniors computer classes happening led by library staff to help boomers and seniors be safe online. Topics include being aware of online hoaxes, preventing identity theft and keeping personal information secure when shopping online. Registration may be required, so it is best to contact the branch:

Maria A. Shchuka - Monday, June 16, 2014. 7:00 - 8:30pm. Learning Centre

Agincourt - Wednesday, June 18, 2014. 2:00 - 3:30pm. Learning Centre

Richview - Wednesday, June 25, 2014. 2:00 - 4:00pm. Learning Centre

North York Central Library - Thursday, June 26, 2014. 2pm. Learning Centre

Albert Cambell District Library - Thursday, June 26, 2014. 1:30 - 3:30pm. Learning Centre

Toronto Reference Library - Friday, June 27, 2014. 10am. Learning Centre

 

Seniors
 

 

To kick off Senior's month the,The  Toronto Senior's Forum invites people to celebrate on Tuesday, June 3 from 11:00am - 2:00pm at Toronto City Hall, Nathan Phillips Square.The Toronto Seniors’ Forum is composed of up to 30 people, who are at least 60 years of age and residents of the City of Toronto, with particular attention to seniors whose voices have been less often heard or unheard.

The City of Toronto delivers more than 40 services for seniors,for more information visit www.toronto.ca/seniors 

 

 

 

 

 

 Have a safe and happy Senior's Month everyone!

Free Science Events in Toronto for May 2014

April 26, 2014 | Emoke | Comments (0)

The Science and Technology Department of North York Central Library compiles a monthly calendar of free science and applied science events in Toronto. Applied science includes health, gardening, pets and food; all subjects found in the department's collection. Here is the May 2014 Calendar.

May's highlights include:

  • May 4: The Amazing Birds of the Park, part of the High Park Sunday Walking Tours. High Park Nature Centre. This tour will be lead by Brian Bailey. Walks are led by volunteer scientists, historians and local naturalists who will help you to understand and explore High Park's many significant features.
  • May 11: Hiking Healthy/Hills and Dales, part of the Evergreen Brick works Nature and Heritage Hikes. Walks in nature are proven to be beneficial for one’s physical and mental health. Come reconnect with nature and get outdoors and active at this healthy hike from Regent Park to Evergreen Brick Works.
  • May 24: Free Toronto Reiki Class, part of The Healing Team. Toronto Reiki and Counselling Services. Leader: Stephanie Norwich, M.Ed.(Counselling Psychology). Reiki Master presents a beautiful and inspiring reiki talk followed by a question period. Topics include: what is reiki, how it works, the history, usage/application, benefits, self treatment, the three levels of training, and steps to becoming a Licensed Holistic Practitioner. The class is also available for groups and organizations.

The Toronto Public Library also offers many free science and applied science events:

May's highlights include:

Welcome to North York Central Library. We're one of the City's most welcoming spaces, open to all for study, research, relaxation and fun.

Our extensive digital and print collections, programs and services are yours to use, borrow and explore. Expert staff are always on hand to help. Meet us in person or join us online.