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Historian Jack Granatstein presents Canada's One Hundred Days on Dec. 3

November 25, 2014 | Andrew | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

Jack Granatstein The Greatest Victory : Canada's One Hundred Days

North York Central Library continues with the eh List author series and its World War I Centenary programs. Award winning Canadian historian Jack Granatstein will discuss his new book The greatest victory : Canada's one hundred days, 1918. Granatstein examines the contribution of the Canadian Corps from Amiens to Mons from August 8, 1918 leading up to the armistice on November 11, 1918, known as Canada's One Hundred Days. Canadians not only helped put an end to the war, they helped shape the course of warfare that would follow later in World War II.

North York Central Library, Auditorium
Wednesday December 3,
7:00-8:30 pm

Toronto Public Library is offering many programs to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War. The library also owns many items including regimental histories, biographies and if you are looking for the names of your ancestors who served in WWI, nominal rolls. Below are just a few examples:

Century of Service : the History of the South Alberta Horse Old Enough To Fight : Canada's Boy Soldiers in the First World War From Thunder Bay Through Ypres With the Fighting Fifty-Second

This program is co-hosted by the Canadiana, Language Literature and Fine Arts and the Society and Recreation Departments of the North York Central Library.

One Hundred Years of Medical Progress in North York : Learn About Connaught Laboratories - November 13

November 10, 2014 | Andrew | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

Join us for an evening tracing the one hundred years of history of Sanofi Pasteur Laboratories, better known as Connaught Laboratories. Began on May 1, 1914 as the Antitoxin Laboratory of the University of Toronto, it expanded in 1916 to include the large property on Steeles Avenue West near Dufferin Street and became known as "Connaught Antitoxin Laboratories and University Farm."

North York Central Library, Concourse Level
Thursday November 13,
6:00-8:30 pm

Refreshments at 6:00 pm
Presentations at 6:30 pm

The evening will feature three talks moderated by Professor Michael Bliss:

Christopher Rutty James FitzGerald Joanna Dean
Christopher Rutty James FitzGerald Joanna Dean
  • The History of Connaught Labs at the Steeles and Dufferin Site with Professor Christopher J. Rutty, Founder and president of Health Heritage Research Services. His presentation will focus on the growth of the Steeles Avenue site and highlight the story of vaccine development, innovation and production.
  • Doctor Gerry FitzGerald : Founder of the Connaught Labs with with James FitzGerald, grandson of Doctor Gerry FitzGerald, who will discuss his book What Disturbs Our Blood : a Son's Quest to Redeem the Past
  • War Horses : Connaught Labs, Tetanus, Antitoxin and World War I with Professor Joanna Dean, Department of History, Carleton University. Her discussion will examine the production of the tetanus antitoxin during World War I which was used by the second British Army Corps.

Co-sponsored by the North York Historical Society, North York Community Preservation Panel and the North York Central Library Canadiana Department. Free admission, all are welcome! Registration is not required. For more information contact the North York Central Library Canadiana Department at 416-395-5623.

Toronto Public Library is offering many programs to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War. The library also owns some items about Connaught Laboratories. Here are a few examples:

What Disturbs Our Blood : a son's quest to redeem the past     What Disturbs Our Blood : a son's quest
    to redeem the past

     by James FitzGerald

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Canadiana Department holds a reference collection of Canadian genealogy, Ontario local history, North York history, and materials related to Canada. The Department also houses collections from these societies:
  • Ontario Genealogical Society
  • Jewish Genealogical Society (Toronto Branch)
  • Canadian Society of Mayflower Descendants
  • York Pioneer and Historical Society
  • North York Historical Society

Toronto Community Newspapers--What Happened in Your Neighbourhood?

October 30, 2014 | Katherine | Comments (2) Facebook Twitter More...

Local history and genealogy are popular passions for many baby boomers (and others), and one often overlooked source are the community newspapers that exist to report on local issues, and to celebrate the activities, schools, sports, businesses and culture in the neighbourhoods of Toronto.

Rosedale Topics, 1923
Click on images to enlarge

The history of the papers themselves tells some of the social history of the city. While the smaller 19th century Toronto newspapers (and there are many) focused on sectarian political and religious issues, by the 1920s, the development of neighbourhoods within the city, the disruptions of the Great War, and the affluence that followed it caused people to look more closely at their day to day lives, and prompted the publication of more local news.

Hill-Rosedale Topics, 1923
Hill-Rosedale Topics, September 15, 1923

The earliest community papers at the Toronto Reference Library, Hill Topics and Rosedale Topics, date from 1921. Here you find an interesting mix of stories on local school children, beauty queens and summer brides, juxtaposed with civic boosterism, construction delays and articles on the rapid population growth that was transforming the city. Places we now think of as central or even "downtown", were just achieving municipal status.

Hill-Rosedale Topics, 1923 Hill-Rosedale Topics, 1923

 

 

 

Hill-Rosedale Topics, October 13, 1923 
    

 
 

 

 

Etobicoke Life, 1992

Etobicoke, now an "inner suburb" of Toronto, has a long history of community newspapers, dating back to at least the 1940s. It was then the township of Etobicoke, made up of the towns of Mimico, New Toronto, the village of Long Branch and acres of farmland. At least five different papers were published over various periods, with the Etobicoke Guardian still going strong.

The seventies exploded with local community activism and journalism. Some of it was political and engaged with the powers that be, calling directly on the citizens affected to make a difference. Many of these local issues are now the stuff of Toronto legend.

The Goose and Duck, 1971
Goose and Duck, July 13, 1971

Guerilla, 1970

Toronto’s own version of the underground press debuted in 1970. Guerilla was political, eccentric, and notice the Classifieds. It changed name in 1974 to become the Toronto Free Press, and lasted another few months. 

Don’t confuse it with Our Toronto Free Press, a tabloid style of the opposite ideological persuasion, that published through the 1990s and into the new millennium. (Interesting how all political stripes like to co-opt that word “free”.) Note here the strangely familiar headlines.

 
Guerilla, 1970
Guerilla, August 17, 1970

Our Toronto free Pass, 1996
Our Toronto Free Press, December 1995/January 1996

 But community newspapers also celebrate the local and the ordinary. Most were and are non-profits, operating on shoe string budgets, produced by dedicated but chronically underpaid professionals and eager volunteers. Some seventies papers lasted only a few years. Others made it through the eighties, but were defeated by the recession of the early nineties. New ones sprang up, and others changed name, or format, or personnel, but continue to the present day. 

Beach Metro Community News, 1988

 

Beach Metro Community News, June 28, 1988

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ward Nine News, founded 1972, continues as the Beach Metro Community NewsWard Seven News morphed into the Cabbagetown-Riverdale News, but ceased in 1994 after 24 years. 

Regent Park Community News reported on the many activities of residents.  Leslieville Community News, established 1988,  became ETC (for East Toronto Communities) News in 1993, and covered the communities east of the Don Valley and south of the Danforth until December of 2008.

Cabbagetown-Riverdale News, 1985
Cabbagetown-Riverdale News, September 4, 1985
Regent header May 75

Regent Park Community News, 1975

 

 

Regent Park Community News, May 1975

   

 

 

 

 

East Toronto Communities, 1993

ETC...News, April 1993

Out in Scarborough, the Bluffs Monitor (originally Birch Cliff News) grew out of big issues like the proposed Scarborough Expressway, and smaller ones, like the need for community centres, libraries and local business support. As a community voice and advocate, it continues to champion local causes and local successes. Guildwood News & Views concentrated more on neighbourhood activities.

Birch Cliff News, 1983
Birch Cliff News, May 20, 1983


  Bluffs Monitor, 1996
Bluffs Monitor, February 1996
  

Bluffs Monitor, 1976 Guildwood News & Views, 1979

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bluffs Monitor, August 1976

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                          Guildwood News & Views, June 1979

Many of the truly independent local voices are disappearing as conglomerates, technology and economics take their toll. Online versions give us some local news for today, but so far, no practical way to save those stories for the future. Still, in most parts of the city, you'll find a neighbourhood paper on a rack in local stores, community centres, or on your doorstep, delivered by armies of dedicated volunteers. Today's news, but preserving the history of your neighbourhood.

Scan Pro

Newsprint is notoriously fragile and bulky to store, so most of the papers held in the Toronto Collection, Humanities & Social Sciences Department at the Toronto Reference Library are in microfilm format, with a few in bound paper volumes. Read the microfilm on the Scan Pro 2000 readers, where you  can zoom in and  out, print, or scan to a USB stick.  

 

You'll also find community papers in the Toronto Star Newspaper Room, Toronto Reference Library  (Lower Level), and in the local history collections of branch libraries like Beaches, Cedarbrae, S. Walter Stewart, Richview, and at the North York Central Library.

 Current Community Newspapers at the Toronto Reference Library:

Annex Gleaner

Beach Metro Community News

Bluffs Monitor

Bulletin, Downtown Toronto

Etobicoke Guardian

Forest Hill Town Crier

 

Leaside Rosedale Town Crier

Mirror (formerly Annex Guardian)

North Toronto Town Crier

North York Mirror

Scarborough Mirror

Villager (Bloor West)

York Guardian

Selected Historical Community Newspapers at the Toronto Reference Library:

Cabbagetown-Riverdale News (1985-1994)

East End Express (1972-1987)

ETC...News (1993-2008)

Etobicoke Life (1984-2002)

Goose & Duck (Toronto Islands) (1971-1974)

Guerilla (1970-1973)

Guildwood News & Views (1970-1981)

Hill-Rosedale Topics (1921-1926)

North Toronto Herald (1988-1999

Our Toronto Free Press (1995-2003)

Parkdale Mosaic (1979-1984)

Regent Park Community News (1972-1977)

Toronto Free Press (1974)

Ward Seven News (1970-1974)

Ward 9 News (1972-1988)

West Toronto Weekly (1922-1948)

Weston Mosaic (1979-1984)

York Reporter (1970-1984)


For further assistance contact:

Humanities & Social Science Department, Toronto Reference Library
416-393-7175
trlhss @ torontopubliclibrary.ca

World War I Centenary : William Avery "Billy" Bishop, Canada's Air Ace - November 11

October 28, 2014 | Andrew | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

Captain William A. Bishop, seated in the cockpit of his Nieuport Scout, on August 6, 1917  Keith Hyde

North York Central Library continues with its World War I Centenary lineup of programs. This Remembrance Day evening, learn about William Avery "Billy" Bishop of Owen Sound Ontario, the top Canadian ace of World War I credited with 72 aerial victories.

North York Central Library, Auditorium
5120 Yonge Street, Toronto,
Tuesday November 11
6:30-8:30 pm
 

Join aviation historian Keith Hyde speaking on the life of pilot Billy Bishop, V.C. war hero and legend. A most fitting topic of Canadian history honouring the Centenary of the First World War.

From Owen Sound to the air war on the Western Front, Bishop's exploits in aerial combat are well documented in numerous books, mostly positive but some questionable. Where was he based? What squadrons was he attached to? What type of aircraft did he fly with the Royal Flying Corps, which together with the Royal Naval Air Service became the Royal Air Force in 1918?

Admission is free. Everyone welcome. For more information call the North York Central Canadiana Department at 416-395-5623.

Toronto Public Library is offering many programs to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War. The library also owns many items about Billy Bishop including biographies, Bishop's own autobiography Winged Warfareand a famous Canadian play about Bishop. Here are a few examples:

Courage of the Early Morning by William Arthur Bishop The Making of Billy Bishop by Brereton Greenhous Billy Bishop Goes to War: a play by John Gray

The Canadiana Department holds a reference collection of Canadian genealogy, Ontario local history, North York history, and materials related to Canada. The Department also houses collections from these societies:

  • Ontario Genealogical Society
  • Jewish Genealogical Society (Toronto Branch)
  • Canadian Society of Mayflower Descendants
  • York Pioneer and Historical Society
  • North York Historical Society

 

 

 

 

World War I Centenary : Canada's Local Responses to the Great War - October 30

October 20, 2014 | Andrew | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

Robert Rutherdale Hometown Horizons: Canada's Local Responses to the Great War

As part of World War I's Centenary, North York Central Library will host a number of interesting programs about Canada's role in World War I over 100 years ago.

Historian Robert Rutherdale (Algoma University) author of Hometown Horizons : Local Responses to Canada's Great War, looks at how people and communities experienced World War I at home, from farmers in Alberta and shopkeepers in Ontario, to civic workers in Québec. Rutherdale looks at many of the big debates in social and cultural history, including demonization of enemy aliens, gendered fields of wartime philanthropy and state authority and citizenship.

North York Central Library, Concourse
5120 Yonge Street, Toronto,
Thursday, October 30
6:30-8:30 pm

Free admission, no registration is required. For more information contact the North York Central Library Canadiana Department at 416-395-5623.

This lecture is part of the History Matters series, presented in colloboration with ActiveHistory.ca and Heritage Toronto.

Toronto Public Library holds a variety of resources about Canada in the Great War. The Toronto Reference Library has an excellent collection of wartime posters, some of which are online in the Digital Archive.

Canadian Patriotic Fund Poster 48th Highlanders Poster Your Chums Are Fighting Poster

The library's TD Gallery hosted an exhibit in 1999 called "Doing Our Bit: Canadians and the Great War (PDF)", and will present a new exhibit in November 2014 on the effects of this devastating war on several Canadian families.

The Canadiana Department holds a reference collection of Canadian genealogy, Ontario local history, North York history, and materials related to Canada. The Department also houses collections from these societies:

  • Ontario Genealogical Society
  • Jewish Genealogical Society (Toronto Branch)
  • Canadian Society of Mayflower Descendants
  • York Pioneer and Historical Society
  • North York Historical Society

Tom Thomson's Vision on Film : See the Award Winning "West Wind" October 21

October 8, 2014 | Andrew | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

In the Northland West Wind: The Vision of Tom Thomson

Join White Pine Pictures in a screening of an award winning film about Tom Thomson, one of Canada's most beloved painters. Described as our greatest colourist and our Van Gogh, Thomson's expressive and vibrant interpretations of the north have become iconic representations of Canada.

Tuesday October 21
North York Central Library, Room 1

5120 Yonge Street, Toronto
6:30-8:30 pm

On July 8, 1917, Thomson paddled across Canoe Lake and disappeared. His body surfaced eight days later. The cause of his death remains a mystery.

Thomson's life, art and death haunts us still and draws the curious and devoted to his memorial in Algonquin Park every summer.

The Lone Pine

Read about Tom Thomson at TPL

Visit the West Wind website to
see samples of Thomson's art

     The Lone Pine - Courtesy
of Art Gallery of Ontario
View the trailer             

Set in Algonquin Park, Georgian Bay, Toronto and Leith, this film unravels the mysteries of Thomson's life and death. Free admission, no registration required. For more information call the Canadiana Department at 416-395-5623.

The Canadiana Department holds a reference collection of Canadian genealogy, Ontario local history, North York history, and materials related to Canada. The Department also houses collections from these societies:

  • Ontario Genealogical Society
  • Jewish Genealogical Society (Toronto Branch)
  • Canadian Society of Mayflower Descendants
  • York Pioneer and Historical Society
  • North York Historical Society

Inside Toronto's Museums : Learn About Toronto's Early History Treasures October 15

September 30, 2014 | Andrew | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

John Goddard Inside the Museums

Join John Goddard, author of Inside the Museums as he illuminates Toronto's early history through its small heritage museums and their prized objects. The discussion will showcase the many scattered historic homes and other buildings as a single community.

North York Central Library, Room 1

Wednesday October 15
7:30-9:30 pm

Co-sponsored by the North York Historical Society and the North York Central Library Canadiana Department. Free admission, all are welcome! Registration is not required. For more information contact the North York Central Library Canadiana Department at 416-395-5623.

Visit Dundurn News for Top Ten Obscure Facts from Inside the Museums including related books.

Check out these websites for more information on the Toronto museums covered in Goddard's book:

Specializing in North York History, Canadiana holds a wide selection of materials about Gibson House located just across the street from North York Central Library.

The Canadiana Department holds a reference collection of Canadian genealogy, Ontario local history, North York history, and materials related to Canada. The Department also houses collections from these societies:

  • Ontario Genealogical Society
  • Jewish Genealogical Society (Toronto Branch)
  • Canadian Society of Mayflower Descendants
  • York Pioneer and Historical Society
  • North York Historical Society

 

Research Guide to the Humber River (Ontario)

September 29, 2014 | Katherine | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

Getting Started

The Humber River watershed is a defining geographic feature of the west and north part of Toronto, and includes some of the oldest native peoples and European settlements in the region. In 1954 it overflowed its banks under the onslaught of Hurricane Hazel, and the resulting loss of life and extensive property damage led to the formation of the Metropolitan Toronto & Region Conservation Authority (now Toronto & Region Conservation Authority), and the establishment of flood plain guidelines that continue to govern development along Toronto's rivers. The still navigable Humber is popular for canoeing and fishing, and there are miles of hiking and bike trails running beside it.

Find research materials on the Humber in the Toronto Collection in the Humanities & Social Science Department at the Toronto Reference Library and the Society & Recreation and Canadiana Departments at North York Central Library. Some titles may also be available at other library branches.

  Humber River Pedestrian Bridge
    Humber River Pedestrian Bridge  Creative Commons 2.0: veggiefrog


Searching the Library Website

    Sugggested Keywords

Use the column at the left on the Library search page to focus and limit your search by type of material, date, library branch or subject.

Other terms related to river valley issues:

  • Pollution
  • Rivers
  • Streams
  • Conservation
  • Watersheds
  • Watershed management
  • Wetlands
  • Urban ecology

    

    Suggested Titles

Walking into wilderness : the Toronto CarryingPlace and Nine Mile Portage

Humber River: the carrying place

Crossing the Humber : The Humber River heritage bridge inventory

Listen to your river : a report card on the health of the Humber River watershed

The Humber : tales of a Canadian heritage river

Toronto wet weather flow management master plan : study area 3 - Humber River : final report

Humber Forks at Thistletown

Pesticide concentrations in the Don and Humber River watersheds (1998-2000)

Humber River watershed fisheries management plan : draft. Prepared in support of legacy: a strategy for a healthy Humber

Legacy : a strategy for a healthy Humber

The Humber River/High Park/western beaches civic design study : final report

Three hundred years in and around Swansea School grounds : the story of the first white man's trip down the Humber River and historical sketch of S.S. 22

The merchant-millers of the Humber Valley : a study of the early economy of Canada

Humber River watershed plan : pathways to a healthy Humber

Hurricane Hazel

Hurricane Hazel : Canada's storm of the century

Flood data : Humber River, October 15-16, 1954

Hurricane Hazel

Hurricane Hazel damage along the Humber River, 1954  Toronto Reference Library

    Suggested Articles

You can find magazine and newspaper articles on the Humber by searching the library’s electronic databases. Try Academic Onefile, Canadian Newsstand Major Dailies, Canadian Newsstand Torstar, Canadian Business and Current Affairs (CBCA), Canadian Periodicals Index (CPIQ), General Onefile. You can find images of the original newspaper coverage of Hurricane Hazel, and other news stories in the Toronto Star: Pages of the Past and the Globe and Mail: Canada’s Heritage from 1844.

These can be searched inside the library, or from home or school using your Toronto Public Library card
 

     Suggested Magazines and Journals

Magazines, newspapers, or newsletters that discuss watershed issues:

Humber Advocate (1994-2001)

Humber River Advocate (2001-2008)

Humber River Advocate (current issues)

Toronto Field Naturalist

Humber 1910
Old Mill, Humber River 1910  Toronto Reference Library

 

Additional Online Sources

Canadian Heritage Rivers System: Humber River

City of Toronto: Humber River Parks

City of Toronto-Humber River/Don River Stream  Restoration and Protection Study

Federation of Ontario Naturalists

Humber River Pedestrian Bridge

Humber Valley Heritage Trail Association

Humber Watershed Alliance

Hurricane Hazel: 50 years later

Ontario Trails Council: Humber River, Old Mill and Marshes

Review of Provincially Significant Wetlands in the City of Toronto

Toronto Plaques: Humber Walks

Toronto Public Library: Historical images of the Humber River

Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA): Humber River Watershed

Waterfront Trail

 

For further assistance contact:

Humanities & Social Science Department, Toronto Reference Library
416-393-7175
trlhss @ torontopubliclibrary.ca


Old Mill Bridge, north of Bloor
Old Mill Bridge over the Humber River  Creative Commons 2.0: John Vetterli

 

See also Research Guide to the Don River (Ontario)

            Research Guide to the Rouge River (Ontario)

Discover First Nations History: New Perspectives on Community Building and Cultural Exchange - September 23

September 17, 2014 | Andrew | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...


Donald B. SmithVictoriaFreeman   CarolynKing

     Donald B. Smith Victoria Freeman                Carolyn King

 

Join us for a special evening of historical exploration and discussion about Toronto's cultural roots with an emphasis on the impact of First Nations peoples.

North York Central Library, Concourse
5120 Yonge Street, Toronto

Tuesday September 23
6:30-8:30 pm

Speakers will include:

Co-sponsored with the North York Historical Society and the Ontario Historical Society. Admission is free and all are welcome. For more information call the North York Central Library Canadiana Department at 416-395-5623.

The Canadiana Department holds a reference collection of Canadian genealogy, Ontario local history, North York history, and materials related to Canada. The Department also houses collections from these societies:

  • Ontario Genealogical Society
  • Jewish Genealogical Society (Toronto Branch)
  • Canadian Society of Mayflower Descendants
  • York Pioneer and Historical Society
  • North York Historical Society

Chart Your Family History Electronically : Learn How to Effectively Use Legacy Family Tree Software September 20

September 9, 2014 | Andrew | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...

Ontario Genealogical Society Logo Legacy Family Tree Software

Genealogy has quickly become one of the most popular hobbies in recent years. Computer software now allows for an even easier creation of your family's tree. One such program is Legacy Family Tree.

If you are already using Legacy Family Tree software and are not sure you are using it fully to help with your family history, this one-day workshop could be for you.

North York Central Library, Auditorium
5120 Yonge Street, Toronto, Saturday September 20
9-5 pm

This workshop intended for beginner or intermediate users of the software, will review basic techniques for using Legacy Family Tree (versions 7 or 8), highlight what’s new in version 8, and explain how Legacy Family Tree now makes it easy for you to make the best use of LDS FamilySearch.

Fee: $60 ($55 for OGS Members). Register at torontofamilyhistory.org

The Canadiana Department holds a reference collection of Canadian genealogy, Ontario local history, North York history, and materials related to Canada. The Department also houses collections from these societies:

  • Ontario Genealogical Society
  • Jewish Genealogical Society (Toronto Branch)
  • Canadian Society of Mayflower Descendants
  • York Pioneer and Historical Society
  • North York Historical Society

 

True Crime in Toronto September 17: Canada's Master Bank Robber Edwin Alonzo Boyd

September 8, 2014 | Andrew | Comments (0) Facebook Twitter More...


Edwin Alonzo Boyd MugshotEdwin-alonzo-boyd-1   The Life and Crimes of Canada's Master Robber

Want to learn more about one of Toronto's most notorious criminals this fall? Look no further!

Join author Nate Hendley in a lively discussion about infamous bank robber Edwin Alonzo Boyd, subject of his 2003 Book. Flamboyant Boyd headed a notorious gang that robbed banks in Toronto and escaped from the Don Jail twice in the 1950s.

North York Central Library, Room 1
5120 Yonge Street, Toronto

Wednesday September 17
7:30-9:30 pm

Co-sponsored by the North York Historical Society and the North York Central Library Canadiana Department. Free admission, all are welcome! No registration is required. For more information call 416-395-5623.

In addition to Hendley's book, Canadiana owns other interesting true crime books from around Toronto and Ontario such as:

Check out these related sites on the history of policing criminals in Canada:

The Canadiana Department holds a reference collection of Canadian genealogy, Ontario local history, North York history, and materials related to Canada. The Department also houses collections from these societies:

  • Ontario Genealogical Society
  • Jewish Genealogical Society (Toronto Branch)
  • Canadian Society of Mayflower Descendants
  • York Pioneer and Historical Society
  • North York Historical Society

Discover the history of your family, your Toronto neighbourhood, or places in Ontario and across Canada.

Research online or at Toronto Reference Library and North York Central Library.

Learn about exciting programs and events.

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